Top 10 Common Health Problems in Yorkies You Must Be Aware Of

There are three types of health problems in Yorkies – inherited, congenital, or acquired. A few breed-specific vulnerabilities are hereditary, forcing Yorkshire Terriers to carry abnormalities since birth.

There are also diseases that these dogs are at high risk of during their life. With proper awareness, you can prevent health hazards from overwhelming your Yorkie.

Your knowledge of these issues also helps in early diagnosis and swift treatment.

The following are some of the most genetic and acquired common health problems in Yorkies.

Hypoglycemia

Abnormally low level of blood sugar is a common health problem in Yorkies and similar toy dogs.

Yorkshire Terriers are at an enhanced risk of hypoglycemia in the first five months of their birth. Adults too can have the issue, especially when they have liver disease or are pregnant.

Yorkies with hypoglycemia are prone to frequent low-energy levels, weakness, drowsiness, and fainting.

You may rub honey or sugar syrup on the gums of your dog as a short-term treatment. Many dogs require a thorough medical investigation and long-term dietary changes. Feeding high protein food after every few hours also helps.

Legg-Perthes Disease

Considered one of the genetic health problems in Yorkies, the disease is marked by hip joint problems. The head of the femur bone turns weak due to the lack of blood supply there.

As a result, the hip joint loses its vitality and becomes deformed. The degeneration gradually takes about 4 to 6 months to appear.

A Yorkshire Terrier suffering from it turns lame, limps while walking, and suffers from pain. Surgery is the most effective treatment for the disorder.

Skin Allergies

Skin health problems in Yorkies occur when they develop allergy following exposure to chemicals, fleas, molds, pollen, or other known triggers.

Excessive itching, scratching, irritation, or hair loss hints at the possibility of skin allergies. Certain allergies caused by wasps or bees are life threatening for your dog.

What are the allergy triggers in your Yorkshire Terrier? Make sure your pooch remains away from them.

Hair Loss in Yorkshire Terriers

Treat severe symptoms immediately to avert any possibility of anaphylactic shock.

Retinal Dysplasia

Another inherited health problem in Yorkies, retinal dysplasia leads to vision problems. The primary reason is abnormal retinal development causing irregularity in the eyeball functionality.

Usually breeders avoid getting offspring from a Yorkshire Terrier with this problem.

The problem can be detected with a thorough eye investigation. If the retina is partially affected, the dog may have smaller blind spots without any major impact.

However, in some dogs, it causes severe vision problems or even blindness.

It has no treatment. You have to train your dog to deal with the vision problem.

Liver Shunt

Also known as Portosystemic Shunt, the problem arises due to a portal vein abnormality. Considered one of the hereditary health problems in Yorkies, it obstructs blood flow to the liver.

As a result, the liver fails to cleanse the blood. Unfiltered blood causes toxin inflow to heart, brain, and other body parts.

Symptoms of a liver shunt in Yorkies include seizures, behavioral changes, jaundice, loss of appetite, muscular weakness, cognitive issues, vision loss, and severe weight loss.

The disease can be life-threatening for Yorkshire Terriers unless treated early. Antibiotics, other medications, and dietary control are primary treatment options. Surgery is the permanent option to treat the problem.

Kneecap Dislocation

Another congenital health problem in Yorkies, kneecap dislocation, results in the kneecap popping out of the knee joint too often.

Birth defects cause improper development of tendons and tissues around the kneecap, allowing it to become unstable.

Kneecap slips out under duress though it returns to normalcy soon. Your Yorkshire Terrier may make a high-pitched sound due to pain. The dog may limp or avoid walking for a few minutes.

Rest and physical therapy can help him overcome the problem to some extent. Surgical correction can be carried out for a permanent solution.

Collapsed Trachea

Common mostly in undersized dogs, the disease is one of the genetic health problems in Yorkies. The windpipe or trachea looks abnormally narrow in a Yorkshire Terrier affected by the disease.

Researchers, however, indicate the hereditary weakness of rings holding the windpipe as the main reason for this disorder.

When you use a dog collar, the problem becomes acute causing respiratory blockage in your Yorkie.

If your dog has noisy or troubled breathing, it may have a collapsed trachea. Frequent coughing and gagging sound too indicate the problem.

2lb Yorkie Beats to Death with a Pruning Shears

Don’t use anything that may cause respiratory problem in your dog. Use body harness instead of a dog collar.

Keep your dog away from respiratory irritants, such as perfumes, smoke, and extremely cold environment. A vet may suggest medication or surgery depending on symptoms.

Pancreatitis

If your Yorkshire Terrier has abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting, pancreatitis may be the cause. It is not a hereditary health problem in Yorkies, which is usually caused by the inflammation of pancreases.

The plausible reasons include excessive fat, toxicity, or bad dietary habits.

Medications help treat symptoms. Dietary changes and precautions provide long-term relief.

Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis

Severe diarrhea with vomiting and loss of appetite in your Yorkshire Terrier could be due to hemorrhagic gastroenteritis.

It causes rapid dehydration putting your dog at the risk of death.

The condition is among health problems in Yorkies requiring immediate medical attention.

Teeth Problems

Most small dogs have teeth issues, and your Yorkshire Terrier is no exception. Check for food remnants and cavity development periodically and clean teeth and gums at least once a week.

Leave a Reply:

Leave a comment below and share your thoughts.

Source

Dog Names – The Top Dog Names In 2020

Looking to your dog’s routes or role can be another great way to pick their name.

Hunting dogs have high prey drive, and stacks of energy.

You will need to choose a name that works with your recall training.

This means one that is easy to say, simple for your dog to understand and isn’t going to get confused with any of his other commands.

So with all that in mind, let’s get stuck in to our top ideas of the best hunting dog names!

Male Hunting Dog Names

When it comes to naming a male hunting dog, you have a lot of options.

There are a lot of good hunting dog names out there, so you have a decent number to choose from.

The name can be as adorable, classic, or unique as you want it to be. It is really whatever suits your tastes!

  • Apache
  • Aslan
  • Avalanche
  • Bane
  • Bear
  • Blaze
  • Bones
  • Cerberus
  • Chevy
  • Chopper
  • Courage
  • Czar
  • Diesel
  • Echo
  • Fang
  • Ghost
  • Gunner
  • Khan
  • Killer
  • Leo
  • Lincoln
  • Midnight
  • Moose
  • Nero
  • Pepper
  • Pistol
  • Rambo
  • Rocky
  • Sarge
  • Tank

Female Hunting Dog Names

Just like with boys, there are a lot of great names for female hunting dogs out there.

However, there is a lot more variety of style it seems when it comes to female names.

You have everything from cute and delicate names, to prim and proper names, to tough and sporty names.

There is just so much variation out there.

  • Ace
  • Archer
  • Astro
  • Bandit
  • Blitz
  • Bolt
  • Boomer
  • Brigade
  • Boomer
  • Bullet
  • Bulls-Eye
  • Chaser
  • Chief
  • Crash
  • Danger
  • Duck
  • Falcon
  • Fetch
  • Harbor
  • Hawkeye
  • Hunter
  • Montana
  • Nyx
  • Porter
  • Radar
  • Ranger
  • Riptide
  • Rocket
  • Sailor
  • Schooner

As you can see, there are LOTS of different ways you can name your new hunting dog.

But what if your pup doesn’t fall into this category?

Finding a fun, unique and suitable name for your new pet can be a challenge regardless of their physical features or breeding background.

But great dog names from movies open up a whole new world when it comes to making your decision.

Not only are dog names from movie stars often recognizable, they can actually provide good practical suggestions too.

After all, they are someone’s name already!

And naming your dog after a character in a movie you love is a great way to celebrate both your dog and your favorite flick.

Dog Names From Movies

Let’s get started with some awesome movie character dog names.

Whether you are searching for the best female dog names from movies or male dog names from movies, there are some lovely ideas here.

And don’t forget, you are totally at liberty to mix it up a bit. There is no reason your little girl pup couldn’t be called Bolt too, after all!

  • Baxter (Anchorman)
  • Barney (Gremlins)
  • Beethoven (Beethoven)
  • Bolt (Bolt)
  • Boris (Lady and the Tramp)
  • Brinkley (You’ve Got Mail)
  • Bruiser (Legally Blonde)
  • Bruno (Cinderella)
  • Buckley (The Royal Tenenbaums)
  • Buddy (Air Bud)
  • Bull (Lady and the Tramp)
  • Chance (Homeward Bound)
  • Chloe (Beverly Hills Chihuahua)
  • Copernicus (Back to the Future 2)
  • Daisy (Snatch)
  • Daphne (Look Who’s Talking Now)
  • Digby (Diby The Biggest Dog in the World)
  • Dodger (Oliver and Company)
  • Doogal (The Magic Roundabout)
  • Dug (Up)
  • Einstein (Back to the Future)
  • Fly (Babe)
  • Frank (Men in Black – though he was really an alien, of course!)
  • Fred (Smokey and the Bandit)
  • Gromit (Wallace and Gromit)
  • Hooch (Turner and Hooch)
  • Elvis (Don’t Tell Mom The Babysitter’s Dead)
  • Fang (Harry Potter)
  • Freckles (The 101 Dalmatians)
  • Hank (The Truth About Cats and Dogs)
  • Jewel (The 101 Dalmatians)
  • Lady (Lady and the Tramp)
  • Lucky (The 101 Dalmatians)
  • Marley (Marley and Me)
  • Max (Terminator)
  • Milo (The Mask)
  • Odie (Garfield)
  • Patch (The 101 Dalmatians)
  • Pedro (Lady and the Tramp)
  • Peg (Lady and the Tramp)
  • Penny (The 101 Dalmatians)
  • Perdita (The 101 Dalmatians)
  • Puffy (There’s Something About Mary)
  • Quark (Honey, I Shrunk The Kids)
  • Reno (Top Dog)
  • Rex (Babe)
  • Rolly (The 101 Dalmatians)
  • Sam (Lethal Weapon)
  • Samantha (I Am Legend)
  • Sandy (Annie)
  • Shadow (Homeward Bound)
  • Shiloh (Shiloh)
  • Skip (My Dog Skip)
  • Slink (Toy Story)
  • Speck (Pee Wee’s Big Adventure)
  • Tito (Oliver and Company)
  • Toto (The Wizard of Oz)
  • Tramp (Lady and the Tramp)
  • Underdog (Underdog)
  • Zero (The Nightmare Before Christmas)

The best dog names from movies are of course the ones that appeal to you the most.

They show off your love for a brilliant film, fabulous actor or even a fantastic canine character.

But that’s enough from the world of the silver screen, let’s go back to those all important choices that you have already made!

Let’s look at the very best names chosen in 2018.

Popular Dog Names In 2018

In 2017 The International Dog Survey was launched on The Happy Puppy Site. And we’re delighted to report that it’s been a hit!

Thousands of results have been collected from happy puppy owners, who have been keen to share their dog’s awesome names.

These were the top 100 dog names for 2018

  • Bella
  • Coco
  • Charlie
  • Lucy
  • Becks
  • Max
  • Poppy
  • Bailey
  • Molly
  • Buddy
  • Cooper
  • Jack
  • Daisy
  • Luna
  • Ruby
  • Sadie
  • Toby
  • Henry
  • Bear
  • Holly
  • Willow
  • Harley
  • Scout
  • Lily
  • Maggie
  • Tucker
  • Millie
  • Lola
  • Marley
  • Monty
  • Leo
  • Finn
  • Dexter
  • Barney
  • Abby
  • Riley
  • Alfie
  • Angus
  • Milo
  • Oscar
  • Shadow
  • Sam
  • Gus
  • Annie
  • Murphy
  • Amber
  • Penny
  • Harry
  • Lilly
  • Hunter
  • Teddy
  • Jasper
  • Brodie
  • Rufus
  • Pepper
  • Jake
  • Winston
  • Loki
  • Ellie
  • Kona
  • Bruce
  • Tilly
  • Gracie
  • Stella
  • Dakota
  • Zeus
  • Ben
  • Ollie
  • Lexi
  • Bruno
  • George
  • Ziggy
  • Baxter
  • Koda
  • Archie
  • Ruger
  • Ozzy
  • Sophie
  • Casey
  • Rocky
  • Maisie
  • Harvey
  • Rosie
  • Skye
  • Layla
  • Pippa
  • Remington
  • Ruben
  • Diesel
  • Duke
  • Ginger
  • Moose
  • Honey
  • Oakley
  • Roxy
  • Nala
  • Hank
  • Beau
  • Piper
  • Ranger

But that’s not all!

The survey didn’t just let us know which dogs names you love the most right now.

Those who joined in also shared a bit about their dogs and themselves.

Most of the responses so far have been from the UK and the USA, but there have also been answers from all over the world. Including Australia, Canada, India, Italy and South Africa, among others!

Of the dogs surveyed, just under 80% were purebred. Labradors were far and away the most numerous breed.

However the survey did see plenty of Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds, Cocker Spaniels, Huskies, Collies and many more besides too.

Of the mixed breed dogs by far the most popular was the Labradoodle, with the Borador, Boxador and Cockapoo following on behind.

Most dogs surveyed were two years old or less, but there was a full of ages going all the way up to 13 years and more.

In fact, a whole 3% of the those who responded had dogs in their teens!

One big surprise was perhaps the gender divide that we saw.

With 54% male and just 46% female, the boys have led the way with this one so far.

…AND THERE’S MORE!

Check out the Name Your Doggy e-book here for more suggestions! 

Source

Dog Breeds with Pictures from A to Z


For thousands of years dogs have been bred. From time to time humans have done inbreeding even from their own ancestral lines and also by mixing them from various lines. Over the centuries the whole breeding process is continuing until the present day, resulting in a huge genetically diversity of all types of dogs, breeds and hybrids, no other mammal can present. Furthermore no speciation developed, despite the appearance of a wide variation of dogs no other animal could obtain. Just compare the extreme difference between a Chihuahua and a Great Dane.

Generally there is a wide interpretation of what is called “breed”. Breeds are actually categorized by a functional type from which a breed has developed. The most of the breeds are traditional breeds with a very long history, who are registered. There are some rare breeds, who have also their own registries, but some new breeds are still under development. There are even a lot of dog breeds, who are in danger to extinct. There are a few cases, where the origin of breed overlaps the frontier of two, three or more countries. As the general rule the dog is listed in the country in that he is most commonly associated, according to the FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale), by the designated country of the dog. There are some dogs, who have an uncertain origin, therefore they are getting classified under several countries.

There are subcategories as working dogs, companion dogs, herding dogs, guard dogs, hunting dogs and sled dogs. Working dogs are for example lapdogs, who are used as therapy dogs. Companion dogs are just providing companionship and are known as pets and who are usually not used for specific tasks. Herding dogs are known as stock dog and they are working with livestock. They are also called pastoral dogs, who do not necessarily have to be trained in herding. Guard dogs defend the property of people. They are also named watch dogs or attack dogs. They bark aloud, when there is a presence of a possible intruder and alert in this way their owners. Hunting dog hunts with or for their owners. There are a lot of different types of dogs, who have the special hunting skills. Sled dogs are also named sledge dogs or sleigh dogs, who were bred historically for pulling sleds to transport or haul supplies into areas which are inaccessible by another method.

Sporting Group
labrador

American Water Spaniel
Boykin Spaniel
Brittany
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Clumber Spaniel
Cocker Spaniel
Curly-Coated Retriever
English Cocker Spaniel
English Setter
English Springer Spaniel
Field Spaniel
Flat-Coated Retriever
German Longhaired Pointer
German Wirehaired Pointer
Golden Retriever
Gordon Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Red and White Setter
Irish Water Spaniel
Labrador Retriever
Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever
Pointer
Spinone Italiano
Sussex Spaniel
Vizsla
Weimaraner
Welsh Springer Spaniel
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Hound Group
saluki

Afghan Hound
American English Coonhound
American Foxhound
Basenji
Basset Hound
Beagle
Black and Tan Coonhound
Bloodhound
Borzoi
Coonhound
Dachshund
English Foxhound
Greyhound
Harrier
Ibizan Hound
Irish Wolfhound
Norwegian Elkhound
Otterhound
Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen
Pharaoh Hound
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Saluki
Scottish Deerhound
Whippet

Working Group
alaskan-malamute

Akita
Alaskan Malamute
Anatolian Shepherd Dog
Bernese Mountain Dog
Black Russian Terrier
Boxer
Bullmastiff
Cane Corso
Chinook
Doberman Pinscher
Dogue De Bordeaux
German Pinscher
Giant Schnauzer
Great Dane
Great Pyrenees
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
Kommondor
Kuvasz
Leonberger
Mastiff
Neapolitan Mastiff
Newfoundland
Portuguese Water Dog
Rottweiler
Saint Bernard
Samoyed
Siberian Husky
Standard Schnauzer
Tibetan Mastiff

Herding Group
border-collie

Australian Cattle Dog
Australian Shepherd
Bearded Collie
Beauceron
Belgian Laekenois
Belgian Malinois
Belgian Sheepdog
Belgian Tervuren
Border Collie
Bouvier des Flandres
Briard
Canaan Dog
Collie (rough)
Collie (smooth)
Entlebucher Sennenhund
Finnish Lapphund
German Shepherd Dog
Icelandic Sheepdog
Norwegian Buhund
Old English Sheepdog
Polish Lowland Sheepdog
Puli
Pyrenean Shepherd
Schapendoes
Shetland Sheepdog
Swedish Vallhund
Welsh Corgi, Cardigan
Welsh Corgi, Pembroke

Terrier Group
terrier

Airedale Terrier
American Staffordshire Terrier
Australian Terrier
Bedlington Terrier
Border Terrier
Bull Terrier
Cairn Terrier
Cesky Terrier
Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Glen of Imaal Terrier
Fox Terrier, smooth
Fox Terrier, wire
Irish Terrier
Kerry Blue Terrier
Lakeland Terrier
Manchester Terrier
Miniature Bull Terrier
Miniature Schnauzer
Norfolk Terrier
Norwich Terrier
Scottish Terrier
Sealyham Terrier
Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Welsh Terrier
West Highland White Terrier

Non-Sporting
englische-bulldogge

American Eskimo Dog
Bichon Frise
Boston Terrier
Bulldog
Chinese Shar-Pei
Chow Chow
Dalmatian
Finnish Spitz
French Bulldog
Keeshond
Lhasa Apso
Norwegian Lundehund
Poodle (Standard and Miniature)
Schipperke
Shiba Inu
Tibetan Spaniel
Tibetan Terrier
Xoloitzcuintli

Toy Group
chihuahua

Affenpinscher
Bichon Frise
Brussels Griffon
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Chihuahua
Chinese Crested
Havanese
Italian Greyhound
Japanese Chin
Lhasa Apso
Maltese
Manchester Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
Papillon
Pekingese
Pomeranian
Poodle
Pug
Shih Tzu
Silky Terrier
Toy Foxterrier
Yorkshire Terrier

Miscellaneous
boerboel

Azawakh
Belgian Laekenois
Bergamasco
Berger Picard
Boerboel
Cirneco dell’Etna
Coton de Tulear
Dogo Argentino
Lagotto Romagnolo
Miniature Australian Shepherd
Peruvian Inca Orchid
Pumi
Sloughi
Spanish Water Dog
Wirehaired Vizsla

FSS Breeds

(Foundation Stock Service)
catahoula-leopard-dog

American Hairless Terrier
American Leopard Hound
Appenzeller Sennenhund
Azawakh
Barbet
Belgian Laekenois
Bergamasco
Berger Picard
Boerboel
Bolognese
Bracco Italiano
Braque du Bourbonnais
Catahoula Leopard Dog
Caucasian Ovcharka
Central Asian Shepherd Dog
Coton de Tulear
Czechoslovakian Vlcak
Danish-Swedish Farmdog
Deutscher Wachtelhund
Dogo Argentino
Drentsche Patrijshond
Dutch Shepherd
Estrela Mountain Dog
Eurasier
French Spaniel
German Spitz
Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen
Hamiltonstövare
Hovawart
Kai Ken
Karelian Bear Dog
Kooikerhondje
Kromfohrlander
Lagotto Romagnolo
Lancashire Heeler
Miniature Australian Shepherd
Mudi
Norrbottenspets
Perro de Presa Canario
Peruvian Inca Orchid
Portuguese Podengo
Portuguese Pointer
Portuguese Sheepdog
Pumi
Rafeiro do Alentejo
Russian Toy
Schapendoes
Slovensky Cuvac
Small Munsterlander Pointer
Spanish Mastiff
Spanish Water Dog
Stabyhound
Swedish Lapphund
Thai Ridgeback
Tornjak
Tosa Ken
Treeing Tennessee Brindle

unrecognized dogs

Australian Kelpie
Large Munsterlander
Patterdale Terrier

Source

What You Should Know Before Adopting a Pet During COVID-19

What You Should Know Before
Adopting a Pet During COVID-19

Pet adoptions have skyrocketed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, leaving some shelters without any animals left to adopt. However, that doesn’t mean every pet is taken. There will always be more pets in need of good homes. If you’ve been planning on adding a pet to your family, here’s how to go about it during the pandemic. 

 

Consider Your Lifestyle 

While you might be at home all the time due to the pandemic, that might not always be the case. You’ll want to think about your life now and in the future. 

 

  • Dogs need attention throughout the day. Before getting a dog, make sure you can give him the attention he needs
  • Cats are known for their independence. While they can be left alone for longer periods of time, they still need time with their humans. 
  • Small pets like rabbits are often lumped in with other “low-maintenance” pets, but they actually require daily care such as cage cleaning and feeding. 

 

Adoption Options

Once you’ve done your research to find a pet who’s a good fit for you, it’s time to start the adoption process.

  • There are dozens of pet adoption websites; in many cases, rescue organizations use sites like these to list pets that need homes. 
  • You can also adopt directly from a shelter or rescue organization. 
  • Fostering a pet is another great option. With fostering, you let a pet live in your home temporarily until he’s able to be adopted into his forever home. 

 

Protecting Your New Pet

Welcoming a new pet into your home is such an exciting time! Before getting started, make sure you take these steps to protect your companion. 

 

  • Create a safe environment for your pet by removing household items that are toxic to pets. 
  • Your pet will also love having some safe toys to play with. 
  • Connect with a veterinarian prior to or immediately after bringing home your pet.

 

Be Prepared at Home

If this is your first pet, you’ll need to get the right gear and have a plan to address adjustment issues.

 

  • Gather food and water dishes, food, bedding, toys and a collar and leash. Petsmart coupons can help you save money on all your purchases. 
  • Find a designated spot in your home where your pet can feel comfortable and safe.  
  • Be patient and ready to deal with carpet or furniture issues for potential accidents.

 

If you’ve been wanting to do your part to help animals during the pandemic, it makes sense to bring one into your home. By making sure you’re mentally prepared for a pet, and that you have the right plan and gear in place, you set yourself and your new pet up for a smooth transition.

Video: Separation Anxiety in Dogs

One of the most common problems a canine behaviorist handles is separation anxiety. It is easy to become frustrated when your dog has separation anxiety, and that frustration can be sensed by your dog making the situation that much more difficult.

SEPARATION ANXIETY

What is separation anxiety, exactly? Separation anxiety is often thought to be simply as a dog who becomes upset when their guardian leaves the house. This is not always the case, though. A dog can experience separation anxiety, in severe cases, by their guardian just leaving the room.

SYMPTOMS OF SEPARATION ANXIETY

Separation anxiety has a variety of symptoms but most commonly involves:

  • Excessive salivation
  • Excessive vocalization (whining, barking, howling)
  • Chewing items in the house
  • Urinating/defecating in the house
  • Scratching the walls and floor in an attempt to escape
  • Depression-like behavior

5 Simple Commands You Should Teach Your Puppy

Contents

  1. How To Teach A Dog To Come
  2. How To Teach a Dog Loose Leash Walking
  3. How To Teach a Dog To Sit
  4. How To Teach a Dog To Stay
  5. How to Teach a Dog to Lay Down

Getting Started

To start off on the right foot (and paw!) with your pup, he’ll need to know what you expect from him. This will make him feel secure in his ability to meet the goals laid out for him going forward.

The foundation of dog training should be based on positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement is the process of giving a dog (or person!) a reward to encourage the behavior you want, like getting a pay check for going to work. The idea is not to bribe the behavior but to train it using something your dog values.  Avoid using punishment such as leash corrections or yelling. Punishment can cause a dog to become confused and unsure about what is being asked of him.  It is important to remember that we can’t expect dogs to know what they don’t know – just like you wouldn’t expect a 2-year-old child to know how to tie his shoes. Patience will go a long way in helping your new puppy learn how to behave.

Reinforcement can be anything your dog likes. Most people use small pieces of a “high value” food for training treats — something special — such as dried liver or even just their kibble. Lavish praise or the chance to play with a favorite toy can also be used as a reward. Dogs must be taught to like praise. If you give the dog a treat while saying “Good dog!” in a happy voice, he will learn that praise is a good thing and can be a reward. Some dogs also enjoy petting. Food is often the most convenient way to reinforce behavior.

Puppies can begin very simple training starting as soon as they come home, usually around 8 weeks old. Always keep training sessions brief — just 5 to 10 minutes —and always end on a positive note. If your puppy is having trouble learning a new behavior, end the session by reviewing something he already knows and give him plenty of praise and a big reward for his success. If your puppy gets bored or frustrated, it will ultimately be counterproductive to learning.

How To Teach A Dog To Come

teach dog to come

teach dog to come

You’ll want to begin training a recall (come when called) in a quiet area and indoors. Sit with your puppy and say his name or the word “come.” Each time you say “come/name,” give your puppy a treat. He doesn’t have to do anything yet! Just repeat the word and give a treat. Easy!

Next, drop a treat on the floor near you. As soon as your puppy finishes the treat on the ground, say his name again. When he looks up, give him another treat. Repeat this a couple of times until you can begin tossing the treat a little further away, and he can turn around to face you when you say his name. Avoid repeating your puppy’s name; saying it too often when he doesn’t respond makes it easier for him to ignore it. Instead, move closer to your puppy and go back to a step where he can be successful at responding to his name the first time.

Once your puppy can turn around to face you, begin adding movement and making the game more fun! Toss a treat on the ground and take a few quick steps away while calling your puppy’s name. They should run after you because chase is fun! When they catch you, give them a lot of praise, treats or play with a tug toy. Coming to you should be fun! Continue building on these games with longer distances and in other locations. When training outside (always in a safe, enclosed area), it may be helpful to keep your puppy on a long leash at first.

When your puppy comes to you, don’t reach out and grab him. This can be confusing or frightening for some dogs. If your puppy is timid, kneel and face them sideways and offer him treats as you reach for the collar. Never call your dog to punish! This will only teach him that you are unpredictable, and it is a good idea to avoid you. Always reward your dog heavily for responding to his or her name, even if they have been up to mischief!

Further Reading

How To Teach a Dog Loose Leash Walking

teach a dog to heel

teach a dog to heel

In competition obedience training, “heel” means the dog is walking on your left side with his head even with your knee while you hold the leash loosely. Puppy training can be a little more relaxed with the goal being that they walk politely on a loose leash without pulling. Some trainers prefer to say “let’s go” or “forward” instead of “heel” when they train this easy way of walking together.

Whatever cue you choose, be consistent and always use the same word. Whether your puppy walks on your left side or your right side is completely up to you. But be consistent about where you want them so they don’t get confused and learn to zig zag in front of you.

First, make sure your puppy is comfortable wearing a leash. This can feel strange at first, and some puppies may bite the leash. Give your puppy treats as you put the leash on each time. Then, stand next to your puppy with the leash in a loose loop and give him several treats in a row for standing or sitting next to your leg. Take one step forward and encourage him to follow by giving another treat as he catches up.

Continue giving treats to your puppy at the level of your knee or hip as you walk forward. When he runs in front of you, simply turn the opposite direction, call him to you, and reward him in place. Then continue. Gradually begin giving treats further apart (from every step to every other step, every third step, and so on).

Eventually your dog will walk happily at your side whenever he’s on his leash. Allow your dog plenty of time to sniff and “smell the roses” on your walks. When they’ve had their sniffing time, give the cue “Let’s Go!” in a happy voice and reward them for coming back into position and walking with you.

How To Teach a Dog To Sit

teach dog to sit

teach dog to sit

There are two different methods for showing your puppy what “sit” means.

The first method is called capturing. Stand in front of your puppy holding some of his dog food or treats. Wait for him to sit – say “yes” and give him a treat. Then step backwards or sideways to encourage him to stand and wait for him to sit. Give another treat as soon as they sit. After a few repetitions, you can begin saying “sit” right as he begins to sit.

The next option is called luring. Get down in front of your puppy, holding a treat as a lure. Put the treat right in front of the pup’s nose, then slowly lift the food above his head. He will probably sit as he lifts his head to nibble at the treat. Allow him to eat the treat when his bottom touches the ground. Repeat one or two times with the food lure, then remove the food and use just your empty hand, but continue to reward the puppy after he sits. Once he understands the hand signal to sit, you can begin saying “sit” right before you give the hand signal.

Never physically put your puppy into the sitting position; this can be confusing or upsetting to some dogs.

Further Reading

How To Teach a Dog To Stay

A puppy who knows the “stay” cue will remain sitting until you ask him to get up by giving another cue, called the “release word.” Staying in place is a duration behavior. The goal is to teach your dog to remain sitting until the release cue is given, then begin adding distance.

First, teach the release word. Choose which word you will use, such as “OK” or “free.” Stand with your puppy in a sit or a stand, toss a treat on the floor, and say your word as he steps forward to get the treat. Repeat this a couple of times until you can say the word first and then toss the treat AFTER he begins to move. This teaches the dog that the release cue means to move your feet.

When your dog knows the release cue and how to sit on cue, put him in a sit, turn and face him, and give him a treat. Pause, and give him another treat for staying in a sit, then release him. Gradually increase the time you wait between treats (it can help to sing the ABC’s in your head and work your way up the alphabet).  If your dog gets up before the release cue, that’s ok! It just means he isn’t ready to sit for that long so you can make it easier by going back to a shorter time.

Once your dog can stay in a sit for several seconds, you can begin adding distance. Place him in a sit and say “stay,” take one step back, then step back to the pup, give a treat, and your release word. Continue building in steps, keeping it easy enough that your dog can stay successful. Practice both facing him and walking away with your back turned (which is more realistic).

Once your dog can stay, you can gradually increase the distance. This is also true for the “sit.” The more solidly he learns it, the longer he can remain sitting. The key is to not expect too much, too soon. Training goals are achieved in increments, so you may need to slow down and focus on one thing at a time. To make sure the training “sticks,” sessions should be short and successful.

Further Reading

How to Teach a Dog to Lay Down

down step 2

down step 2teach dog to go down step 1teach dog to go down step 1
“Down” can be taught very similarly to “sit.” You can wait for your dog to lie down (beginning in a boring, small room such as a bathroom can help) and capture the behavior by reinforcing your dog with a treat when he lies down, giving him his release cue to stand back up (and encouragement with a lure if needed) and then waiting for him to lie down again. When he is quickly lying down after standing up, you can begin saying “down” right before he does so.

You can also lure a down from a sit or stand by holding a treat in your hand to the dog’s nose and slowly bringing it to the floor. Give the treat when the dog’s elbows touch the floor to start. After a few practices, begin bringing your empty hand to the floor and giving the treat AFTER he lies down. When he can reliably follow your hand signal, begin saying “down” as you move your hand.

Just like with sitting, never use force to put your dog into a down.

And Remember …

Keep training sessions short and fun. End each session on a positive note. If you feel your dog is having a difficult time learning or being “stubborn,” evaluate the speed of your training and the value of your rewards. Do you need to slow down and make the steps easier, or does your dog need a bigger paycheck for a harder exercise?

The “Basic 5” commands will give your puppy a strong foundation for any future training.

And just think, if you and your puppy continue to work hard—and have fun—at training, someday you may become obedience champs!

Source

10 Best Training Tips

Ok, he’s finally home. Training needs to begin immediately, considering the new pattern on the rug, not to mention the dog’s breakfast he’s made of your new Manolo Blahnik strappy sandals. But where should you start?

Whether you train your new puppy or dog yourself, take classes, or hire a private trainer, some basic training tips should be tackled right out of the gate. These top 10 tips from professional dog trainers at the top of their game will help get you going.

Aside: When your puppy is old enough, think about getting him or her neutered or spayed, likewise if you adopt a dog. A neutered or spayed dog is more docile, less aggressive, and may be more open to successful training.

Top 10 training tips

  1. Choose your dog’s name wisely and be respectful of it. Of course you’ll want to pick a name for your new puppy or dog that you love, but for the purposes of training it also helps to consider a short name ending with a strong consonant. This allows you to say his name so that he can always hear it clearly. A strong ending (i.e. Jasper, Jack, Ginger) perks up puppy ears—especially when you place a strong emphasize at the end.If he’s an older dog, he’s probably used to his name; however, changing it isn’t out of the question. If he’s from a shelter, they may neglect to tell you that he has a temporary name assigned to him by staff. If he’s from a breeder, he’ll come to you with a long name, which you may want to shorten, or change. And if he’s coming out of an abusive situation, a new name may represent a fresh start. But we’re lucky: dogs are extremely adaptable. And soon enough, if you use it consistently, he will respond to his new name.

    New name or old, as much as possible, associate it with pleasant, fun things, rather than negative. The goal is for him to think of his name the same way he thinks of other great stuff in his life, like “walk,” “cookie,” or “dinner!”

  2. Decide on the “house rules.” Before he comes home, decide what he can and can’t do. Is he allowed on the bed or the furniture? Are parts of the house off limits? Will he have his own chair at your dining table? If the rules are settled on early, you can avoid confusion for both of you.
  3. Set up his private den. He needs “a room of his own.” From the earliest possible moment give your pup or dog his own, private sleeping place that’s not used by anyone else in the family, or another pet. He’ll benefit from short periods left alone in the comfort and safety of his den. Reward him if he remains relaxed and quiet. His den, which is often a crate, will also be a valuable tool for housetraining.
  4. Help him relax when he comes home. When your puppy gets home, give him a warm hot water bottle and put a ticking clock near his sleeping area. This imitates the heat and heartbeat of his litter mates and will soothe him in his new environment. This may be even more important for a new dog from a busy, loud shelter who’s had a rough time early on. Whatever you can do to help him get comfortable in his new home will be good for both of you.
  5. Teach him to come when called. Come Jasper! Good boy! Teaching him to come is the command to be mastered first and foremost. And since he’ll be coming to you, your alpha status will be reinforced. Get on his level and tell him to come using his name. When he does, make a big deal using positive reinforcement. Then try it when he’s busy with something interesting. You’ll really see the benefits of perfecting this command early as he gets older.
  6. Reward his good behavior. Reward your puppy or dog’s good behavior with positive reinforcement. Use treats, toys, love, or heaps of praise. Let him know when’s he’s getting it right. Likewise, never reward bad behaviour; it’ll only confuse him.
  7. Take care of the jump up. Puppies love to jump up in greeting. Don’t reprimand him, just ignore his behavior and wait ’til he settles down before giving positive reinforcement. Never encourage jumping behavior by patting or praising your dog when he’s in a “jumping up” position. Turn your back on him and pay him no attention.
  8. Teach him on “dog time.” Puppies and dogs live in the moment. Two minutes after they’ve done something, it’s forgotten about. When he’s doing something bad, try your chosen training technique right away so he has a chance to make the association between the behavior and the correction. Consistent repetition will reinforce what’s he’s learned.
  9. Discourage him from biting or nipping. Instead of scolding him, a great way to put off your mouthy canine is to pretend that you’re in great pain when he’s biting or nipping you. He’ll be so surprised he’s likely to stop immediately. If this doesn’t work, try trading a chew toy for your hand or pant leg. The swap trick also works when he’s into your favorite shoes. He’ll prefer a toy or bone anyway. If all else fails, break up the biting behavior, and then just ignore him.
  10. End training sessions on a positive note. Excellent boy! Good job, Jasper! He’s worked hard to please you throughout the training. Leave him with lots of praise, a treat, some petting, or five minutes of play. This guarantees he’ll show up at his next class with his tail wagging—ready to work!

Source

The Puppy Training Guide: Guest Post

Training Puppy the First Week

Puppies learn very quickly with proper instruction. The first few days at home are extremely important for puppies and the precedents you set now will last a lifetime. All family members must agree upon responsibility and rules for the new pup.

Read more …

House Training a Puppy

It’s normal for a young puppy to be a little ‘input-output’ machine. Since puppies are growing and developing rapidly, they eat food often, burn up lots of energy and seem to need to eliminate constantly! They also have not yet developed bowel and bladder control, so they can’t ‘hold it’.

Read more …

Crate Training a Puppy

Crate training can be an effective way to house train a puppy. Puppies do not like to soil their resting/sleeping quarters if given adequate opportunity to eliminate elsewhere. Temporarily confining your puppy to a small area strongly inhibits the tendency to urinate and defecate.

Read more …

Training a Puppy to Stop Biting and Mouthing

Biting and mouthing is common in a young puppy especially in play and while teething. Puppies must learn to inhibit their bite and normally, they would learn this from their littermates. But, because we take them away from this environment before this learning is completed, we must train our puppy they cannot bite us.

Read more …

How to Train a Puppy to Stop Whining, Crying, and Howling

Whining, crying and howling often result when a puppy is left alone. Puppies will whine and cry when separated from their owners. The puppy is afraid he is being abandoned by his pack and is sounding the alarm so that he can be rescued. At other times, a puppy whines, crys, or barks because they need or want something.

Read more …

Puppy Obedience Training

Obedience training is one of the best things you can do for your puppy and yourself. Although obedience training doesn’t solve all behavior problems, it is still the very best foundation for solving just about any behavior problem. Training opens up a line of communication between you and your puppy.

Read more …

Training Your Puppy to Come When Called

Training Your Puppy to Come When Called

To many a puppy, the command “come here” means, “quick, run the other way!” Your puppy is always learning whether you are intending to teach something or not. We often unintentionally train our puppy NOT to come when called.

Read more …

Training Puppy to Stop Jumping Up

Training Puppy to Stop Jumping Up

Jumping up can be dangerous as well as annoying. Young children and elderly people can easily be toppled over and seriously injured by exuberant, friendly dogs. Start now to teach your puppy not to jump up. Even little dogs can cause problems and injury to themselves and others when they leap and jump around.

Read more …

Training a Puppy about the Collar, Leash and Stairs

Training a Puppy about the Collar, Leash and Stairs

Introducing your puppy to his collar, leash and the stairs can be a challenge. If your puppy is trained properly, it will be simple, satisfying and successful. Always use praise and lures rather than force.

Read more …

Training Puppy to Stop Pulling On Leash

Training Puppy to Stop Pulling On Leash

Do not drag your puppy. Do not yank or pull on your puppy’s delicate throat and neck. Never use a choke collar on a puppy. Instead, teach your puppy to walk nicely on leash before he develops a habit of lunging and pulling on leash.

Read more …

Training a Puppy to Control Barking

Training a Puppy to Control Barking

Barking is a perfectly natural canine behavior. Puppies bark, whine or howl for many different reasons. Barking can be a blessing as dogs will alert to sounds and movement we cannot detect. Barking can also be a puppy’s cry for help! Here are some training tips to help you understand and also put limits on puppy barking.

Read more …

Submissive and Excitement Urination in a Puppy

Submissive and Excitement Urination in a Puppy

Submissive urination is a normal way for your puppy to demonstrate submissive behavior. Even a dog that is otherwise housetrained may leave dribbles and puddles of urine at your feet when greeting you. Excitement urination with a puppy is usually caused by lack of bladder control. The puppy is not aware that he is urinating; he’s just excited and any punishment will only confuse him.

Read more …

Puppy Socialization - Why Socialize A Puppy?

Puppy Socialization – Why Socialize A Puppy?

Socialization and puppy training are of utmost importance as puppyhood is the most important and critical time in your puppy’s development. What you do and do not do right now will affect your puppy’s behavior forever. A properly socialized puppy is well adjusted.

Read more …

Training Puppy to Chew Her Toys

Training Puppy to Chew Her Toys and Stop Chewing Everything in Sight!

Any area that the pup has access to must be kept clear and clean. Put out of puppy’s reach anything you don’t want him to chew or destroy. Do not allow your puppy to have unsupervised access to ‘unchewables.’ Do not chase the puppy in an attempt to take something away. Instead provide puppy with her own toys and teach her how to play with them exclusively.

Read more …

Training a Puppy to Overcome Separation Anxiety

Puppy Separation Anxiety

In some situations, a puppy will experience separation anxiety when left alone. They will often bark, chew, dig, scratch at the door, soil the house or destroy your home and yard. We often unintentionally will train a puppy to behave this way by causing over-dependancy in our puppy.

Read more …

Winning Your Puppy's  Love, Trust and Respect

Winning Your Puppy’s Love, Trust and Respect

Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy’s love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.

Read more …

Share These Puppy Training Articles!

 

Source

This Step-by-Step Guide Can Help You Completely Train Your Dog

Are you ready to start training your dog or puppy? Proper training and socialization are among your dog’s basic needs. It’s important to start training your dog as soon as possible.

At first, dog training can seem pretty overwhelming, especially if this is your first dog. The truth is that training your dog is a very big project. If you take it step by step, you will find the task to be far less daunting. Here is some information to help get you started:

  • Start a Dog Obedience Program: Learn how to set a basic foundation before you begin to train your dog.
  • Train Your Dog Using Games: Training your dog should be fun! Everyone knows it’s easier to learn when you are having a good time, so try implementing some games into your dog training regimen.
  • Six Weeks to a Well-Trained Dog: Using this schedule as a guide, you can teach your dog the basics in about six weeks.
  • Positive Reinforcement: There are many different ways to train a dog, but most dog professionals agree that the positive way is the best for both the dog and trainer.

Watch Now: How to Train Your Dog With Positive Reinforcement

Need help with dog training? Consider getting help from a dog trainer. Try group classes and/or private lessons, and check here for tips on affordable dog training.

Unless you plan to keep your dog outdoors–and few of us do because it’s not recommended–you’ll need to teach your dog where to eliminate. Therefore, house training (also called housebreaking or potty training) is one of the first things you need to work on with your dog. Crate training can be a very helpful part of the training process. This includes house training as well as many other areas of training:

  • Crate Training Dogs and Puppies: Here are the basics of training your dog or puppy to accept and even enjoy the crate. Not only will it help with housebreaking, but it will also give your dog a place of his own.
  • How to House Train your Dog: When it comes down to it, house training is not that complicated, but this doesn’t mean it’s easy. Consistency and diligence are key during the housebreaking process.
  • Submissive/Excitement Urination in Dogs: If your dog is still having accidents in the house, it may be more than a simple housebreaking issue. Your dog might urinate out of excitement or to express submissive behavior.

Every dog needs to learn to walk on a leash. Besides the fact that most areas have leash laws, there will be times when keeping your dog on a leash is for his own safety. Learn how to introduce your dog or puppy to the leash, then teach him how to walk properly on the leash, even beside you on a bike. A loose leash walk teaches your dog not to pull or lunge when on ​the leash, making the experience more enjoyable for both you and your dog.

Black lab puppy on a leash, watching his owner Chalabala / Twenty20

Socialization means training your puppy or adult dog to accept new people, animals, and various places by exposing him to these things. Socialized dogs are less likely to develop behavior problems and are generally more welcomed by others. Socialization can also help prevent the development of fears and phobias.

Clicker training, a common form of positive reinforcement, is a simple and effective dog training method. Although it is still fine to train your dog without clicker training, many people find it helpful. With clicker training, you can easily and effectively teach your dog all kinds of basic and advanced commands and tricks. It’s fast and easy to learn how to clicker train your dog

There are some basic dog training commands and dog tricks that every dog should know like come, speak, drop it, stay, back up, etc. Basic commands give your dog structure. In addition, they can help you overcome common dog behavior problems and will help keep your dog safe.

How to Train Your Dog to Stay

What’s more fun than showing off your dog’s cool tricks?! Dog tricks are a great way to take your dog training to the next level and give your dog some mental stimulation.

dog training treats lukajani / E+ / Getty Images

Proofing is the last step in training your dog to do any new behavior. Learn how to proof behaviors so your dog will be as obedient at the park or a friend’s house is he is in your own living room.

Remember, just because you have reached the final stages of training, it doesn’t mean that behavior problems won’t crop up. Learn about the most common dog behavior problems and how to deal with them. These guides will help you navigate this part of the training process:

  • Proofing Behaviors: Practice behaviors in a variety of situations with different levels of distraction. Without proofing, your dog may behave well in your living room, but seem to forget all his training when he is outside the house.
  • Teach Your Dog Self-Control: This method teaches your dog that nothing in life is free, but that he needs to earn things like food and attention through obedience.
  • Common Dog Behavior Problems: Understanding potential behavior issues can help you detect and address them before things get out of control.
  • Dog Behavior Management Versus Dog Training: While dog behavior management and dog training are two different things, they are not mutually exclusive. Behavior management is an important part of any dog training program.

Once your dog has mastered all the basics, you can consider moving on to more advanced tricks. These activities will help keep your dog active, fit and mentally stimulated. Plus, they will help strengthen the bond you share with your canine companion.

Remember that training is an ongoing process. You will never be completely finished. It is important to keep working on obedience training throughout the life of your dog. People who learn a language at a young age but stop speaking that language may forget much of it as they grow older. The same goes for your dog: use it or lose it. Running through even the most basic tricks and commands will help them stay fresh in your dog’s mind. Plus, it’s a great way to spend time with your dog.

Australian Shephard on agility course Terralyx/ Twenty20

Source

dog-with-treat

Puppy School – Puppy Training Classes

** COVID-19 update: All Puppy School classes are temporarily postponed until further notice due to current restrictions to essential services. Thank you for your patience and understanding. **

What will I learn at Puppy School?

PETstock Puppy School’s program is based on using a reward-based training method which teaches pet parents:

  • How to communicate with your puppy or dog
  • How to develop solid foundation obedience in all environments
  • The importance of socialisation, mental and physical stimulation
  • Ways to help curb any behavioral problems
  • How to find the correct equipment for your dog
  • The appropriate rewards for best results

PETstock provides a safe environment that will see you and your dog or puppy thrive together under the skilled guidance of our friendly, professional training team.

Skills/Topics:

  • Week 1
    • Bridge/marker and release word
    • Focus, sit and recall exercises
    • Building the bond wth your puppy
    • Toilet training, socialisation, nutrition information

    Week 2

    • Mat exercise
    • Down exercise
    • Social interaction
    • Sit for a pat
    • Health, jumping, digging information

    Week 3

    • Loose lead walking
    • Social interaction
    • Sit & Down stay
    • Complex skill
    • Training equipment information

    Week 4

    • Stand exercise
    • Social interaction
    • Sit & wait for food
    • Basic first aid
    • Grooming information

    Week 5

    • Graduation
    • Where to from here
    • Responsible pet ownership

Skills/Topics:

  • Week 1
    • Calming/massage techniques
    • Engagement exercises
    • Training techniques
    • Social interaction (all weeks)
    • Motivation information

    Week 2

    • Bridge/marker words/release words
    • Target training (Teaching phase)
    • Recall with wait
    • Mat exercises
    • Behavioural issues information

    Week 3

    • Stand exercise (stand stay for preschool grads)
    • How to check your dog
    • Loose lead walking with exercises
    • Targeting
    • Health requirements

    Week 4

    • Leave it/ food refusal
    • Stay exercise on and off mat
    • Party tricks – having fun
    • Give, take, fetch

    Week 5

    • Graduation
    • Q & A

Is my puppy or dog suitable for PETstock Puppy School classes?

To ensure we’re providing all Puppy School students a safe and healthy environment, your puppy or dog will need to be:

  • In good overall health
  • For level 1 and 2: Minimum C5 Vaccination.
  • For Puppy Preschool: Minimum C3 vaccination 10 days prior to class.
  • Currently flea and worm treated
  • Friendly towards people
  • Friendly towards other dogs

If you are unsure if your puppy or dog meets these requirements, please contact the Puppy School Trainer at your local PETstock store.

Need to get your puppy or dog’s vaccinations, flea and worming up to date? Visit PETstock VET.

What to expect from your dog at PETstock Puppy School

Just like humans, dogs learn at different rates and each dog will often behave differently to the others during class. You may find that you dog is active, a barker, shy, boisterous or even timid.

These behaviours are all normal and it’s likely your buddy’s behaviour will change as the program continues. It is important to concentrate on your dog’s development and not compare them to others in the class. Your trainer will ensure that each dog receives individual attention throughout the course.

What to bring to PETstock Puppy School

  • Your puppy or dog!
  • Your dog’s current vaccination certificate
  • Flat collar and lead
  • Mat or towel
  • Treat pouch and high value treats (in pieces which are no larger than your small fingernail)
  • Your dog’s favorite toy

Tip: To help grab your pooch’s continued attention, don’t feed your puppy or dog prior to class.

Keep in mind:

  • Arrive 10 minutes before class
  • Wear suitable attire and closed footwear
  • Family involvement in your dog or puppy’s training is highly encouraged! However please keep in mind that the minimum age for owner-trainers is 10 years old, and then only under full adult supervision
  • Keep your puppy or dog on their leash at all times, unless instructed otherwise by your trainer

The value of homework

Each week, our Puppy School trainers provide participants with recommended activities to complete with your dog before the next week’s class. The work you do at home with you dog is vital part of achieving success in PETstock Puppy School!

Attendance

We understand that occasionally, events beyond control mean you may need to miss a class. If this is the case, simply let your PETstock Puppy School trainer know and they can advise you on how to work on your skills at home with your dog and resume normal classes the following week. If you should miss more than three sessions, we ask that you re-enrol to complete the program at another time. No refunds will be given for non-attendance.

Source