5 Ways to Prepare Your Dog for Natural Disasters

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This may seem like it’s a bit early to write about… but the National Weather Service is calling for widespread tornadoes in the month of May. And, regardless of the time of year, it’s always good to be prepared for natural disasters. Understanding how to prepare for natural disasters for your family, and for your beloved dog, is extremely important.

During times of natural disaster, many dogs are lost. In a tornado situation, for example, we rush our family to the basement. Then, we’ll come back up as fast as possible to call for our dog if he hasn’t already followed us. But, remember, sometimes there isn’t much time to take shelter. If your dog hasn’t followed yourself and your family down into the shelter, he or she could easily become lost.

For those of you reading in my hometown of Western New York, tornadoes are less frequent, but remember they can still happen. It wasn’t long ago when a tornado swept through Randolph, New York, hitting many homes. And, we do actually have frequent tornado warnings throughout the summer time.

Way #1: Ensure Your Dog has Identification

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You should make sure your dog has identification on his or her collar. The identification tag should have your name, phone number, and address engraved into it. If your dog gets separated from you, this could be extremely helpful in helping someone find her way back.

Way #2: Microchipping Your Dog

One of my newest clients, PetKey, has emphasized the importance of microchipping your dog. And yes, my dog, Molly has a microchip. I’ll admit that I didn’t use to think microchipping your dog was “that” important. Because, all of my dogs have always had their identification on their collar. But, what happens if that collar gets lost during a natural disaster? There’s a high chance your dog will lose her collar during all of the chaos of trying to locate her family following the natural disaster. Then what?

The microchip contains a unique identifier connecting her to you. When a lost dog enters a humane society, or a veterinarian’s office, one of the first actions they take is scanning for a microchip. If the dog does have a microchip, they jot down that unique identification number and enter it into a universal system. Then, they’re able to see all of the details in your file (the dog’s name, the dog’s age, any medical conditions the dog has, and your name and address).

Way #3: Ensure You Have Your Supplies Ready

Having a ‘to-go’ back for your dog ready is an excellent idea. Do this before the natural disaster occurs so you’re not scattering packing up for your dog as well as the rest of your family. You can even keep one ‘ready’ bag in your shelter, as well as in your car.

The ready bag should contain a minimum of 5 days of food and water. Your dog’s ready bag should also contain photographs of your dog(s)… and cats if you have cats with you as well. In addition to a paper full of their medical issues (if any), you should also have a paper containing their behavioral issues (if any). And, don’t forget to pack extra collars and leashes (litter box and litter if you have cats as well).

Way #4: Bring Crates for Your Dog(s) and Vaccination Records

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If you need to evacuate your home, be sure to bring your dog’s crate. If you have to go to an evacuation shelter, most of them do accept pets, but often require dogs are in their crates.

Many shelters also want you to have copies of your dog’s veterinary records. They want to make sure your dog has all of their shots, and know if your dog has any type of medical condition they may need help for.

Way #5: Look for Dog-Friendly Hotels

Another way to make sure your dog(s) is able to stay with you… is to search for dog-friendly hotels. When there’s a hurricane coming, you often have several days of warning which allows you to evacuate and get as far away from the hurricane as possible.

Unfortunately, fewer and fewer hotels are allowing dogs. And, if you travel with your dog, i’m sure you already know this. An excellent site you can use to find pet-friendly hotels is a website called Bring Fido. You can take a look at Bring Fido by clicking here.

In addition to helping your find dog-friendly hotels, Bring Fido can also let you know if there are any local restaurants you’re able to bring your dog to. Because, we know, in these types of situations, the stress is high and we want our dog (of course, he’s part of our family) to go everywhere we go.

A Video Sum it Up

Most people are particularly fond of videos to learn information… so here’s a video to sum up some of what we just talked about.

Share Your Stories

If you have ever been involved in a natural disaster, and have additional tips, we want to hear from you! In the comments below, please let us know how you prepared.

 

Could CBD Help My Dog’s Seizures?

 

CBD Oil and Seizures: Does it Really Help?

It has been found that one to five percent of dogs have a seizure disorder. Watching your dog have a seizure is a frightening experience, especially when it’s the first time. You feel out of control. And, you’re not exactly sure how to help your dog. If this should happen, you should try to be calm and observe his surroundings to make sure he is away from anything that could harm him. You must also remember they could accidentally bite you if your hands get too close to their mouth during a seizure.

When we adopt our dogs, serious conditions like seizures aren’t usually our main concern. But, learning about everything that could affect our dogs is important.

If you’re unsure of what a seizure looks like, you’ll generally notice the following symptoms:

  • Collapsing
  • Stiffening of the muscles
  • Jerking
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Foaming at the mouth
  • Dazed/confused gaze

After a dog has a seizure, she might have difficulty walking. She may be disoriented. Or, stare off into space. You might also notice her bumping into things she usually knows are there.

CBD has become popular in the dog world. And, it comes as no surprise once you find out it’s not only been found to help with seizures, but with pain, sleep, anxiety, skin problems, cancer, and digestive issues, too.

There are 2 Types of Seizures

There are two types of seizures; symptomatic or idiopathic.

Symptomatic seizures are caused from an abnormality inside or outside of the brain (lead poisoning, encephalitis, head trauma).

Idiopathic epilepsy doesn’t have a cause, though. And, it’s thought to be genetic. Dog breeds who are commonly diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy include English Springer Spaniels, Viszlas, Collies, Beagles, and Dachshunds.

What’s the Best Way to Treat Seizures?

The medication that is prescribed to dogs with seizures can carry heavy side effects including lethargy, long-term liver damage, and/or confusion.

One of the methods dog lovers are turning to is Cannabidiol, or CBD. CBD oil is a non-toxic, natural, and effective form of treatment (of course, make sure you talk to your vet).

When you’re researching CBD and seizures in dogs, there are hundreds of positive testimonials. But, it comes as no surprise that CBD is met with controversy.

CBD Dosage for Dogs

When you choose to use CBD oil for your dog with seizures, it’s important to start at the lowest dose possible. You can then increase the dosage if necessary.

The dosage of the CBD oil is also a discussion you could have with your veterinarian.

Side Effects of CBD Oil

When you’re looking for a new medication for your dog, natural or pharmaceutical, you want to know the side effects.

CBD has no known side effects when administered on its own. However, CBD can have interactions with certain prescribed medication by inhibiting a family of liver enzymes, called cytochrome P450. This enzyme metabolizes more than 60% marketed medications we consume.

Read more about CBD drug interactions here. Click here for a full list of Medications Metabolized by Cytochrome P450 3A4

CBD, Not THC

Dogs are extremely sensitive to THC. THC is the primary psychoactive component of a marijuana plant. Cannabidoil (CBD) is one of 113 compounds found in cannabis plants. The compounds, known as Cannabinoids, are natural and don’t contain any psychoactive properties or effects.

CBD with extremely low doses of THC may help dogs with seizures significantly, though. And, it has been found to be particularly helpful to dogs who are experiencing pain from cancer and/or seizures.

Dr. Stephanie McGrath is a veterinarian who specializes in neurology at Colorado State University. She is an advocate for CBD in veterinary medicine and is currently leading a clinical study on the treatment of epilepsy (which causes seizures).

 

Testimonials Say it All

Here at CannaCanine, we share testimonials so you’re able to hear real-world experiences about dogs who have used our products. Below, you will read a testimonial about Blaise, a dog who was experiencing seizures. His owner no longer wanted him to take phenobarbital… so she considered CBD oil. The CBD oil worked wonders on Blaise.

“Blaise started to experience seizures when he was just a year old. The seizures started to be mild and were few at the start. I thought nothing of it at first because they were so infrequent. When Blaise was around two and a half he started having partial seizures. These affected half of his body and he would suddenly tumble to the ground.  This was absolutely horrifying to watch as they came often without warning.

To help combat his seizures I was recommended to give him phenobarbital. Phenobarbital is a common medicine given to dogs to help treat seizures. Several people told me to hold off on the phenobarbital treatments due to the ill side effects on dogs. I decided to wait before starting treatment to see if the seizures would return. By Blaise’s third birthday he finally had a full seizure. My worst fears had finally manifested!

Our vet immediately put Blaise on a high dose of phenobarbital for every 12 hours. Blaise became so drugged up that he would lose his balance and fall over. The worst of it was when he fell down twelve flight of stairs! I hated seeing him like this. His perky and fun personality was gone, replaced by lethargy and sadness. Blaise became a shell of the fun dog he once was.

A a nurse I had read articles on the beneficial effects of CBD oil on seizures. I started to research natural and alternative medicine for canines to learn more about CBD oil. At first I was cautious but decided to try it on Blaise. It was the best decision I could make! I was glad I ordered the CBD treatment. Despite the process of weaning him off of phenobarbital, the first dose of CBD oil made him more alert. Little by little, I got him off the phenobarbital.

Today, Blaise is seizure free and no longer taking phenobarbital. All thanks to CBD oil!”

Chat with Your Vet

Before implementing CBD oil in your dog’s routine, you should talk to your vet first. If your dog is struggling with a medical condition, you want to make sure you have the dosage right. And, you also want to ensure your dog is a suitable candidate for CBD use.

If your veterinarian isn’t familiar with alternative medicine, you might consider contacting a veterinarian who specializes in it. You can find an alternative veterinarian by searching the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association’s website.

 Try it Today!

CannaCanine is 100% organic and non-GMO, two qualities you should search for in any CBD oil to ensure maximum quality. CBD that isn’t organic could contain pesticides and herbicides, which could result in more harm than good for your dog.

CannaCanine only contains two ingredients- organic MCT Coconut Oil and Organic CBD Hemp Oil. This is another factor you should consider when searching for CBD oil for your dog. Generally, the more ingredients there are in the oil, the lower the quality of the oil.

Why is coconut oil included? Coconut oil increases the absorbency of the CBD oil. And, it can work wonders for our dogs. Coconut oil can help with itchy skin, eczema, cuts, scrapes, wounds, and hot spots. And, on top of all of that, it’s a powerful anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, and anti-viral.

I couldn’t wait to try CBD oil for my dogs after learning all the benefits. And, for a limited time, CannaCanine is offering a special promotion.

This year is the Year of the Dog, and to celebrate, CannaCanine is offering you 30% off of your store purchase. Start shopping now and use code YEAR before the deal ends!

 

*You can find this article on CannaCanine’s Blog here*

Written by Amber L. Drake, Contributor for CannaCanine

Heartwarming Video: Rescue Dog Fosters Dozens of Kittens — FACE Foundation

Zuca was a pregnant stray when she was taken in by an animal welfare agency in Oregon. All her puppies were adopted, and eventually so was Zuca. This sweet pup became best friends with a cat named Stout in her new forever home. Sadly, Stout passed away and Zuca was depressed…until her human mom Ronda […]

via Heartwarming Video: Rescue Dog Fosters Dozens of Kittens — FACE Foundation

Let’s Hear From You: What Do You Need?

Hello, everyone! I’m so happy you’re here. As you can see, the Dog Behavior Blog has been completely revamped. As I was sitting down to write an article for you, there are so many ideas popping through my head. But, before I write another article, I want to hear from you.

What do you need help with? What questions do you have? This is your opportunity to ask your questions, and allow me to address them in an article, or perhaps a series of articles, so you (and your fellow dog lovers) can learn more about their dogs.

As a professional in the industry, you sometimes skip over the most common questions. What’s familiar to you may not be familiar to someone ‘outside the box….’ if you know what I mean.

And, on top of your questions, is there anything you hope Canine Companions will offer in the future? Are you looking for a specific e-course, e-book, instruction sheet, recipes, etc?

Please feel free to submit a comment, or use the Contact Us page, to submit your questions, comments, and/or concerns.

I can’t wait to hear from you.

Amber L Drake

Canine Veteran’s Day: How to Help

Tomorrow is Canine Veteran’s Day. And, here at Canine Companions & Dog Behavior Blog, would like to share some information about our canine veterans here. Please take a seat, and read/listen to the article.

You might even find your soulmate dog after reading this.

You’re going to want to grab your tissues before reading and watching.

What Do Dogs Do at War?

In war, our dogs are the first line. They are first to go into a dangerous territory. And, they let their handler know if it’s okay to continue walking, or to stop in their tracks.

Watch this documentary to follow dogs and their handlers through the tears, blood, and sweat during war in Afghanistan:

Robby’s Law: Saving Lives, Encouraging Adoptions

Before Robby’s Law was enacted in 2000, dogs who came back from war were euthanized. Now, handlers have the option of adopting their dog once they come back to the states. And, if their handler isn’t able to care for them… they are able to be placed for adoption.

Over 90% of canine veterans are adopted by their handlers at the end of their service. And, it’s not hard to understand why. Watch the videos below to see the strength of their love for one another.

To Show You How Special the Bond Handlers & Their Dogs Share

Army dog races into the arms of his handler three years later:

Veteran reunited with bomb-sniffing dog:

Military hero dog reunited with handler:

 

Adopting a Military Working Dog

Most of the MWD’s available for adoption are puppies, or relatively young dogs, who didn’t make it through the training (only about half graduate training).

There are occasionally older dogs who have been at war, though. They may have medically retired due to an injury, or retired due to their age.

It’s important to note that those dogs who have been to war often have PTSD- similar to our human soldiers.

Only recently have we learned that dogs can suffer from this condition following war times. These dogs have been exposed to everything we were- and potentially more- including gunshots, explosions, and other loud and/or violent experiences.

Symptoms of PTSD in dogs include:

  • Fear of noise
  • Fear of new situations
  • Avoidance or fear of buildings
  • Flashbacks

These can usually be managed, but they’re important for you to understand when considering the adoption of a dog from war.

Organizations to Contact About Adopting a Military Working Dog

You can contact the following organizations if you’re interested in adopting a military working dog:

United States War Dogs Association

Save-A-Vet

Mission K9 Rescue

Take Other Action to Help This Canine Veteran’s Day

There’s a petition going around to help canine veterans here. 

  • The petition changes the wording from “adoption” to “foster” in case a dog is placed into a police force after retirement.
  • The military handler becomes attached to the dog throughout his or her entire life; their name is on all paperwork, so they’re able to be with their dog forever if they would like to be.
  • And, if they aren’t with their dog, they are able to find out how they’re doing and where they are any time.
  • The petition also requests handlers be permitted to retire their dog if they don’t believe their dog is able to handle ‘the job’ any longer.
  • And finally, only the handler is able to agree and sign off on an adoption.

 

 

War Dog: A Soldier’s Best Friend

Channing Tatum has released his documentary, “War Dog: A Soldier’s Best Friend,” just in time for Veteran’s Day November 11, 2017. The documentary is set to be released on HBO for all who are waiting to watch.

The purpose of the documentary is to help more people develop more appreciation for the bond war dogs and their handlers share. The bond is unlike any other, and it goes beyond taking on tasks… they save each other’s lives.

Tatum showed scenes of dogs in combat, as well as personal in-depth interviews with their handlers, to help watchers understand what really happens ‘behind the scenes.’

One of the featured guests is Dave Nielson, a former Delta Force operator, whose war dog went missing in Iraq, and is still MIA years later.

To learn more, click here.

Puppies in Hurricane Irma

The winds came, the fence was down. I wandered away, hiding in a shed from something called “Irma”. So much pressure, the puppies would not wait. When they found me, I was holding up a large board, protecting my clan. They gave me a new name. Atlas. ************************************* Photo courtesy. Orlando Sentinel. These pups were […]

via Storm Puppies — vanbytheriver

What’s a Puppy Mill?

Puppy mills are very difficult to write about. If you don’t know what a puppy mill is, then be prepared to become emotional after reading this article. PLEASE NOTE: THIS ARTICLE MAY CONTAIN GRAPHIC CONTENT.

There are approximately 10,000 puppy mills in the United States today.

Puppy Mills Explained

Puppy mills, in the technical explanation, are commercial breeding facilities. Now, with this explanation, they don’t sound too terrible. Once you dive a little bit deeper, you will understand why these places are so harmful.

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The Real Truth of the Matter

In the ‘every-day’ puppy mill, dogs are over-crowded, and living in extremely unsanitary conditions without veterinary care. In order to maximize their profit, mothers are bred non-stop without any time to recover. The puppy mill puppies are often sold to pet stores where people will see how adorable the puppies are without any idea of where they came from.

Now, not saying these people are ‘bad’ for not knowing… most people truly do not know about puppy mills and their horrors. Puppy mills are not something that is commonly talked about.

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Living in Unsanitary Conditions

In a puppy mill, dogs are kept in cages with wire flooring that damages the paw pads on their feet. Cages are also often stacked on top of one another to maximize the profits of the organization. The more cages they can stack, the more dogs they can have, and the more money they can make.

Once mother dogs are physically no longer able to produce, they are killed as they are considered to no longer be useful.

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Genetics Don’t Matter

If a puppy comes from a puppy mill, the likelihood of that puppy having some type of congenital or hereditary problem is extremely high. In a puppy mill, dogs are bred regardless of what illnesses they may have. Remember, the puppy mill wants to make a profit, and if a mother dog can have puppies they will sell the puppies regardless of if they are healthy or not.

Once home, their new guardian may also realize their new puppy has pneumonia, parasites (like worms and fleas) or another illness they weren’t originally aware of when they adopted the puppy from the puppy store.

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Red Flags

  • The largest red flag is purchasing from a pet store. Many pet stores, unless under contract with a humane society or dog rescue, will have puppies from a puppy mill. Stores in malls are most known for this. A huge red flag to watch out for is puppies that are extremely overpriced.
  • If you go to the mall and see the most adorable Corgi puppy, ask how much she is. In puppy mill cases, these puppies can sell for up to $1,500-$2,000 per puppy!
  • If you ask to meet the parents, and they say the parents are not able to be seen, this is a red flag.
  • Giving a puppy away at an extremely young age: Some puppy mills adopt puppies at as early as six weeks old!

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Help Hurricane Dogs

There are so many dogs who need our help. Dogs have been stranded, abandoned and lost during the hurricanes. Humane societies are in need of donations, many rescues were damaged or unable to keep their dogs in the rescue organization and other rescue organizations had to help and are now overloaded. We can help with even a small donation to a humane society or rescue organization. This does not have to be money but can even be items we have just sitting around in our homes.

Hurricane Dogs

Amber L. Drake published an article with Jamestown Post-Journal about dogs who need help due to Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma. To read her article, please visit the Post-Journal article, “Hurricane Dogs” here.

Drake has also created a Facebook Group for those who know of dogs who need homes or are missing their dog to post to. You can find the Hurricane Dogs Facebook Page here.

Jacksonville and Houston are in Need of Donations

Drake has outlined two Humane Societies in great need:

The Houston Humane Society (houstonhumane.org) is in need of:

  • Puppy food (dry and canned)
  • Dog food (dry and canned)
  • Towels (new or used)
  • Bleach
  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Cotton balls
  • Q-tips
  • Bath mats
  • Newspapers
  • Dog treats
  • Thundershirts
  • Baby wipes
  • Leashes

The address for the Houston Humane Society is P.O. Box 450528, Houston, TX 77245.

In Florida, the Jacksonville Humane Society (jaxhumane.org) has also been severely affected. Some of the items Jacksonville Humane Society is in need of include:

  • Dog crates
  • Puppy milk replacement
  • Dog beds
  • Plain wire shower curtain hooks
  • Towels
  • Kong toys

If you would like to send materials to Jacksonville Humane Society, items may be sent to 1821 Foster Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32216