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Should I Put My Dog In Training?

Image Source: Integrity K9 Services: Executive Protection Dogs

If you’ve adopted a puppy or an adult dog, you may be wondering if you should invest in dog training. Is it really necessary? Why does it matter? Whether you are struggling to tame your unruly canine companion or simply want to fine-tune your dog’s skills, training has numerous positive outcomes for both pet and owner. Check out the following benefits of dog training services that every owner should know.

Safe and Sound

Training your furry friend will ensure his or her safety. If your dog is obedient, he or she is far less likely to dart out in front of a car and more likely to come back when called in the face of precarious situations. A trained and properly socialized dog will often be less aggressive towards other animals and people. Not only is this a security measure for your dog’s safety, but for others and their pets as well. We recommend starting early, if you have a pup, so that they grow up with the expectation that it is not okay to be aggressive.

Busy Owners

If you are super busy, you may feel you have no time to allot for training your pet. In the short-term, a dog training service will take up more of your time. In the long-term, dog training may actually save time. Dog training can be useful for busy dog owners who don’t have hours to spend on picking up after their pets’ accidents or providing constant monitoring and support. It is easier to leave your dog with peace of mind knowing that you can spend more time on what you need to focus on (and with your dog) rather than fixing your untrained dog’s mistakes.

Create a Strong, Lasting Bond

If your primary goal is to strengthen the bond you have with your dog, dog training services are the way to go. Statistics illustrate that a trained dog has a better bond with its owner. Positive training will improve communication, emphasize teamwork, and foster mutual respect. Your dog will become fully integrated into your family, respect your rules, and enjoy life to the fullest.

Train to Protect, Retrieve, or Alert

After you lay down a basic framework of obedience rules and commands for your dog to follow, you may decide you want to teach him or her a special skill. As your dog moves further throughout formal basic training, he or she will be able to learn more advanced commands that involve protecting you, retrieving important objects you need when you are unable to, or even alerting you to danger.

References:

Benefits of Taking Your Dog To Obedience Training

Dogs: Positive Reinforcement Training

5 Ways Owning a Dog Improves Your Mental Health

It is well known that dogs are the ultimate companions. They offer friendship and comfort to children and adults alike. But dogs can also have a positive impact on your mental health. Particularly for those with PTSD, dogs can provide emotional support and reduce loneliness. Here are five ways that owning a dog can improve your mental health:

Dogs Can Decrease Stress and Anxiety

When feeling anxious or overwhelmed, petting your dog can relax you. The repetitive motion of stroking the dog’s fur and focusing on the rhythm can recenter your thinking and provide a calming influence. Oxytocin is also released when you connect with your pet, which reduces cortisol levels and reduces anxiety and stress.

Dogs Get You Out of the House

It is common for those struggling with depression, anxiety or PTSD to isolate themselves and to avoid leaving the house. However, a dog needs its owner to take him out for walks or for play. This exercise releases endorphins, which increases positive feelings and reduce sensations of pain. Even the exposure to sunshine and fresh air can improve stress levels and depression symptoms.

Dogs Will Listen to You

It can be embarrassing or overwhelming to discuss feelings of depression or anxiety with friends or family for fear of judgment. Dogs, however, offer a sympathetic and unbiased ear, and provide love and comfort regardless of what their owner has to say. Talking through problems or concerns with your dog can have therapeutic effects that positively impact mental health symptoms.

Dogs Provide You With Purpose

When bombarded with anxious and negative thoughts, it can be hard to find value in everyday life. The act of caring for a dog provides an owner with purpose and responsibility, which has been shown to improve mental health. Feeding the dog, taking him outside and playing with him allows for a positive focus on your mental and emotional energy.

Dogs Bring You Joy

Dogs are playful and eager by nature, which can be contagious. Whether playing throw and catch or snuggling on the couch, happy moments with your dog can increase serotonin levels. Serotonin helps to regulate mood, improve your sense of wellbeing, and keep depression at bay.

Training might seem a bit daunting at first, but there are plenty of resources available to help you out! While owning a dog will not cure mental illness, caring for and spending time with your dog can make a positive impact. The everyday routines of walking, playing with, and engaging with your dog can increase neurotransmitters that boost your mood and improve your mental health.

References:

How Dogs Can Help Combat Vets with PTSD | Low VA Rates

What Dogs Teach Us about Peace, Joy, and Living in the Now | Tiny Buddha

Forget the Treadmill. Get a Dog. | The New York Times

German Shepherds: The Ultimate Guide

German Shepherds continue to be one of the most popular dog breeds. They often rank internationally within the top 10 of all dog breeds. They are renown for their intelligence and trainability as well as their regal appearance. They are working dogs that were initially bred in Germany for their herding and guarding abilities. The American Kennel Club classifies them in the herding group.

Physical Attributes

German Shepherds are large dogs, weighing around 80 pounds. Their size is ideal for the work that they perform. While they do not need regular trips to a professional dog groomer, they do require regular brushing. German Shepherds have a double coat that sheds continuously. They top the list of all breeds for shedding. While most dogs are healthy, be aware that this breed is notorious for having hip dysplasia and other joint diseases.

Intelligence and Personality

German Shepherds are known for their intelligence and trainability, but a lot of people also tend to think that they are also rather aggressive. They’re not actually! German shepherds are a lot calmer than you think. This is why they are such a popular dog breed. They rank within the top 10 breeds for their ability to learn. This characteristic makes German Shepherds ideal as working dogs for military, law enforcement or placement as service dogs for people with disabilities. They are loyal, and they have a sincere desire to please their owners. Unfortunately, these guarding and herding instincts can also become problematic for people when dogs are not properly trained or socialized. Poorly bred dogs can inherit overly aggressive or shy traits that can challenge even the most experienced dog owner.

With proper training, German Shepherds thrive in either a working or family environment. They get along well with children and other pets in the home. Their loyalty is legendary. They are generally aloof around strangers and will protect their family. Early socializing with people is essential so that the dog learns to recognize regular human activity versus the unusual. If German Shepherds are not socialized with other people, they can become aggressive and overprotective of their family members. This social balance is one that every owner will need to understand.

Energy and Exercise

German Shepherds are energetic and need regular exercise, but German Shepherds are calmer than you think. These dogs have a strong work ethic and are always ready for an outing. They are not couch potatoes. They thrive in an active lifestyle – so you’ll want to invest in some high energy toys. Activities such as agility, Herdengebrauchshund trials and scenting will keep these dogs busy. They are also excellent companions for runners. If the dog has no job, he will find one. They can develop destructive tendencies if they are not given things to do, or they lack proper training. For the most part, German shepherds are quiet, and they are not known for their barking.

Breed Ban Lists

German Shepherds are on breed ban lists. Think carefully about adopting a German Shepherd before investigating local ordinances or homeowner association regulations. If you travel, your dog may not be welcome at hotels, RV parks and may be banned from some communities. Check your insurance. Some companies will have exclusions for some dog breeds. German Shepherds have a mixed reputation. They may be an insurance or legal liability.

Choosing Your Dog

Choosing a dog will be one of the most critical activities you will do. A dog will impact your life for the next 10-15 years. This is not a decision to take lightly or impulsively. If you are a new dog owner, you should seriously consider adopting an adult dog. They will have the training and socialization critical for this breed.

Before adopting a German Shepherd:

  • Get to know other people who own German Shepherds.
  • Visit kennels without committing to any purchases.
  • Interact with German Shepherds as well as other dog breeds.
  • Contact pet organizations; discuss your interest in German Shepherds.
  • Meet with professional trainers.

The best places to adopt your dog is from a breeder who has dogs with the temperament that you want. Contact an established breed rescue organization. This is the best place to look for an adult dog.

Take an expert or a knowledgeable person with you to help assess any dog that you adopt. A second opinion may save you years for frustration. Have the dog vet-checked before finalizing any purchase.

German Shepherds are amazing dogs. They want to please. They have intelligence and a strong work ethic. There are positive and negative traits in every dog breed. Analyze why you want a dog. If your vision of dog ownership matches that of a German Shepherd, you will have a long, enduring relationship with this noble breed.

 

Love Your Dog? Kick These Bad Habits Today

A dog’s expected lifespan is already less than 20 percent of that of a human. Rover certainly does not need the effects of his owner’s bad habits to rob him of even more years from his existence on earth. So for the sake of your own health and that of your barking buddy, here are some bad habits that you should consider quitting immediately:

Smoking

Nicotine addiction, as any substance use disorder, is a chronic relapsing brain disease of the reward pathway rewiring. Addiction is characterized by dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal, and has genetic predisposition as well as gender differences. This is why it is important to be evaluated and treated by a specialist in order to achieve the best results. So not only is smoking a surefire way to destroy your health and shorten your life, but research has suggested that second-hand smoke can have the same damaging effects on your loved ones. If you have a dog, you likely count him or her on your list of breathing beings that matter the most to you. And if your pets live indoors, you should be aware that your smoking habit could lead to nasal and lung cancer in dogs.

Laziness

It is no secret that dogs mimic the behaviors of their owners. So if you spend your entire day sitting on the couch watching TV, your dog is likely to do the same. But dogs need exercise just as much as humans do. While they need to move to maintain their physical health, they also need exercise to feel happy about the life they live.. So tell your rear end to quit its addiction to the cushions on your couch. Start incorporating frequent walks into your daily routine, or maybe start doing yoga (with Fido!).

Not Picking Up After Yourself

Speaking of laziness, you should consider the health of your pets the next time you think about neglecting to throw away your candy wrappers and to take your dishes to the sink. Dogs are world-renowned lickers and chewers. And they typically do not care what the item is made of that they have in their mouth. If you decide to continue the habit of leaving your trash out where it does not belong, it is only a matter of time until your dog eats chocolate or chokes on a wrapper.

Losing Your Temper

You might be surprised just how much your emotions influence those of your dog. If you have a habit or yelling or screaming on the phone or to other family members in your house, your dog will feel the stress in your voice. As a result, your dog’s heart rate will increase and adversely affect his or her health.

References:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/pets/7912759/Your-dog-does-behave-like-you-scientists-prove.html

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/27/dog-imitation-humans-canine-behavior-video_n_3653115.html

https://rightpathaddictioncenters.com/smoking-cessation-programs/

 

5 Surprising Benefits of DOGA—Yoga with Fido

Yoga has taken a novel form ‘doga’, which is based on the concept of doing yoga with a companion. However, the companion in doga is your best friend, the dog instead of a human counterpart. The meditative sessions are beneficial not just for you but your pooch as well.

Pooches enjoy the pet-massage and relaxing music at the doga classes. It can motivate them to join you in your yoga each day and bring more fun, vigor, and energy to the class. If your dog shows disinterest still, why not begin it at home where he feels comfortable to be around you?

How Does Doga Benefit You And Your Dog?

Let’s explore the positive effects you’ll reap after joining doga sessions ‘regularly’. It shouldn’t be irregular at any cost or else there are no results.

  1. Better Understanding with Dog:

According to Dr. Danni Shemanski, doga can develop a feeling of being important and loved in your four-legged. If your pooch has been craving for time and attention, doga session will provide him with an opportunity to connect with you. If your pooch is suffering from separation anxiety, it can be tackled well by doing doga with the pooch. According to Dr. Danni Shemanski, doga can develop a feeling of being important and loved in your four-legged.

The mindfulness exercises and a feeling of being connected help to improve your understanding with the dog.

Remember: To avoid poopy mats at the end of the day, don’t forget to take the Fido’s poop scooper, poop bags, etc.

  1. Improved Dog Behavior:

Doga has shown to improve the focus of dogs and their obedience level. Their anxiety problems are toned down to a great extent.

Moreover, as you start feeling connected with your Fido, you’ll begin to understand his body language better. The meditative doga will surely improve your patience level during dog training. This patience and understanding have a two-pronged effect on the dog to demonstrate better behavior and obey the commands.

  1. Reduced Anxiety Levels:

Yoga, music and companion dog will assist in relaxing your mind, body, and soul. It’ll reduce the anxiety levels of pooch by utilizing his excessive pent-up energies. Breathing exercises are extremely relaxing; while cuddling the pooch will add to the good feeling.

The bonding between you as the owner and your anxious/fearful dog will strengthen after attending doga classes regularly. You’ll act more patiently towards the dog. Aggression, anxiety, and other destructive behaviors will be toned down gradually.

  1. Weight Loss:

Whether you are obese or your dog, you both are going to benefit from doga by burning the extra ton of calories. The meditative exercises work on all your body muscles through stretches.

The doga poses involve dogs to do the stretches and imitate your yoga poses. Therefore, the extra calories will get burned and extra energy will be invested positively.

When your dog will try to imitate you, he will definitely end up looking funny. Among all the fun and exercise, you would forget how much time has passed. Yeah, a motivation to visit doga class regularly!

  1. Social Skills:

Dog parks are one good opportunity for you to meet a bunch of people and socialize more often. Doga classes provide you with an equal opportunity to socialize, but with people who are more self-aware, mindful and maybe a bit anti-social. If you are fond of peaceful company, you’ll find many of them at doga classes.

The pooch will learn to socialize too with people and their dogs at the yoga class. The dogs at yoga class will mostly be well-mannered and well-trained due to the meditative effects of yoga. Your Fido might learn a thing or two from them as well.

Introducing a New Dog to Your Home

The first few days in your home are a special, yet anxious, time for you and your new dog. Your new dog will likely be confused about where he is. He won’t immediately connect your home with his home. It’s a completely different environment than what she knows (whether she came from a shelter or a family- it’s still different). It’s up to you to ensure she has the smoothest transition possible.

Before Your Bring Her Home

Before you bring your new dog home, you should determine which area of your home your dog will spend the most time. Then, dog-proof that area and place the crate somewhere comfortable (if you’re crate training). Usually, the kitchen works best. It’s easy to clean up in case of any accidents. Their knowledge of house-training may be lost during a time of great stress like this.

If you plan to crate-train your dog, the crate should be set up before you bring your dog home. Don’t forget to place a mattress of some kind in the crate with them. The type of mattress you should have varies based on the breed of dog you are bringing home, and the age of the dog. Be certain to do proper research on this before bringing your new dog home.

Now, dog-proofing. Dog-proofing your home is critical to keep your dog safe. Tape off any loose wires. Place household cleaners, medications, and other chemicals up high. If you have plants on the floor, do some research and see which plants dogs can and can’t be near.

Finally, have their collar and leash ready to go. On the collar, there should be identification tags already attached. If your dog doesn’t already have a microchip, this may also be something to consider. The microchip isn’t a GPS device, but if your dog were to ever get lost, the microchip would be scanned and an identification code unique to your dog containing all your details would be available.

On the First Day

The first day home could be extremely stressful or overwhelmingly exciting for your dog. Either way, give your dog time to acclimate to your home before you allow any ‘strangers’ to come over. Even if you think your dog is doing wonderful with the transition- one new event could spark stress in the first week. If you have children, show your children the appropriate way to approach a dog.

When you pick up your new dog, don’t forget to ask what she ate that day (and the type of food). If you feed your new dog a completely different food, this could lead to an upset stomach and diarrhea. We don’t want that. An upset stomach could make the transition even more stressful for both him and us.

If you would like to feed a different brand/type of food, do so over a one-week period adding in the new food to their old food slowly. Watch for any signs of stomach upset or loose stools. If you do notice any symptoms, lessen the amount of new food and extend the transition time.

When you arrive home, immediately show your dog where the potty area is and softly say “potty-potty” or similar. Be patient during this time. Even if your dog is fully potty-trained, don’t forget there could be accidents. Your dog may not act like he has to use to the bathroom while he’s outside, then come in and immediately have an accident. Don’t panic, this is a completely normal behavior when being introduced to a new home.

A routine should be put in place immediately. Structure is extremely helpful to a dog adjusting to a new home, and your resident dogs as well if they don’t already have a routine. Feeding, potty-time, and play/exercise, should have an approximate time each day. If the time changes by a half hour occasionally, that’s okay.

For the first few days of your dog being home, try to be as calm and quiet as possible. Limiting excitement during this time will help her adjust. And, it will give you time to get to know your dog better. Take this time to build a foundation for the bond you will share.

Training should also begin immediately. But, after the first week, you can increase the amount of physical and mental stimulation your dog is receiving. Training also helps a dog settle in further and strengthens the bond you are building.

Introducing Your New Dog to Another Dog

If you have a resident dog, introduce your new dog to your resident dog outside in a neutral area. If you have more than one resident dog, introduce one at a time. Don’t rush the introduction. Each dog should be on a leash, and each leash should be loose to allow the dogs to get to know one another.

After the outside introduction, you can bring your new dog inside and do the in-home introduction (if all goes well outside). If you bring your new dog inside immediately without the outside introduction, this could spark a huge list of problems. Keep each interaction between your new dog and your resident dog(s) short and as pleasant as possible. If you see any sign of tension, immediately separate the dogs and try again an hour or so later.

Don’t leave all the dogs alone together until you know it’s safe to do so. Watching your dogs’ body language can help you understand when it’s safe.

The Bottom Line

The most important take-a-way here involves patience. Be patient with your new dog’s behaviors, training levels, and the bond you are establishing. Some dogs adjust quickly and form a bond immediately. Others take more time. Commit as much time as possible to getting to know your new dog while spending time with your resident dogs. Watch your new dog’s body language to understand what she is communicating to you and others.

dog-with-treat

Eliminate Food-Guarding Behavior in 7 Steps

Guarding possessions, whether it be food, a special toy, or any other item, is a normal behavior in dogs. When dogs ran wild, they were forced to guard their possessions to survive. Those who did guard their food, and/or their family were more likely to survive and thrive. Unfortunately, this could become an issue for us, as their family.

Guarding behavior can range from completely harmless to extremely aggressive. Some dogs guard their resources from everyone. And, others guard their possessions from only certain people (like ‘strangers’).

Some dogs guard their bone. Some dogs guard their toy. Some dogs guard their food.

Which of the above is your dog doing?

We’ll talk about how to resolve these issues. And, if your dog isn’t resource guarding, we’ll talk about how to prevent resource guarding as well.

Prevent the Behavior

dog-with-treat

If you have a puppy, now is an excellent time to begin preventing resource guarding. Puppies are prone to developing food guarding behavior because they must compete with their litter mates.

As soon as you bring your dog home, you should begin hand-feeding. Sit down with your puppy and feed him one piece of kibble at a time. Speak softly to your puppy as you’re feeding.

Once your dog is comfortable with hand-feeding, you can move to the bowl. Set the bowl in your lap or directly next to you. Watch your dog’s behavior as she’s eating with you. Continue speaking to your dog in a soft, positive voice as she’s eating.

My Dog is Already Food Guarding

If your dog is currently guarding her food, there are ways to desensitize your dog. The process we will use is known as counterconditioning.

While completing these exercises, be sure to listen to vocalizations and watch your dog’s body language. This will help you understand how he or she is feeling during this time.

The First Step: Only Standing Nearby

You need to go about this step-by-step. Try standing a few feet away from your dog while she’s eating her kibble. During the first step, you should not try to move closer. Calmly talk to her in a reassuring manner while she’s eating. This should be repeated a minimum of ten times before moving to the next step.

The Second Step: Standing and One Step

In the second step, you should still begin by standing a few feet away from your dog. But, you can take one step closer to your dog at this time. When you take your step, throw a treat toward your dog’s food bowl. Then, step back to where you were in the first place. Each day, you can take an extra step (as long as your dog is calm/relaxed). Step 2 should also be repeated a minimum of ten times before moving to step 3.

Step 3: Standing and Walking Away

If your dog has successfully mastered steps 1 and 2, you can move on to step 3. If your dog is still uncomfortable, please stay with the first two steps.

In the third step, continue talking to your dog in a soft tone, while walking toward his food bowl. Stand next to your dog’s food bowl, place a treat in the bowl, and walk away slowly. This step should be repeated a minimum of ten times.

Step 4: The Treat Trick

Continue applying what you have learned in the first three steps. In this step, while your dog is eating, you can hold a treat in your hand. Slowly show your dog the treat as he’s eating his meal. This step should encourage your dog to stop eating what’s in the bowl and take the treat. Once your dog has taken the treat, walk away and stand a few feet away from your dog. Continue to do this at each mealtime until your dog has finished eating.

Step 5: Pick Up the Bowl

The next step… raising the bowl. Please only attempt this step if your dog is 100% comfortable with steps 1-4.

Stand next to your dog and pick up her bowl with one hand. Don’t pick it up all the way… only lift the bowl slightly from the floor. Then, return the bowl to your dog immediately.

Step 6: Now She’s Comfy

Once your dog is comfortable with step 5, you can take the bowl away, place a treat in the bowl, and return it. Your dog now associates you with goodies. At this point, your dog should no longer have any problem with you being near her food.

Step 7: The Final Step

The final stage is to help the other members of your family go through all six steps. Be sure everyone in the household completes the steps in the same manner you did. And, don’t skip a step! This will allow your dog to learn there’s no reason to guard his food… not only from you but from anyone.

DO NOT PUNISH

Do not punish your dog for guarding her food. Your dog is guarding her food because she thinks you’re going to take it away and she won’t get it back. Punishment often results in the behavior worsening as the trust between you and your dog is lost.

DISCLAIMER:

If your dog becomes aggressive with his or her food, you should not attempt to resolve this behavior on your own. Please contact a Canine Behaviorist to assist in the process.

 

cbd-oil-for-dogs

How CBD Oil May Help Dogs with Cancer

When your dog is suffering from cancer, watching them fight can become overwhelming. And, it’s equally as frustrating since we can’t help as much as we would like to. Thankfully, there continues to be more and more research released regarding alternative treatments. One potential alternative treatment you may want to investigate is CBD oil. Fortunately, one of the companies I work with offers excellent, high-quality CBD Oil (it’s important to note here– I do not receive any type of compensation for referrals– I just absolutely love their product).

Before we go on further into this article, it’s important to note that CBD oil for dogs isn’t the cure for cancer in dogs. We wish CBD oil could be the cure, but unfortunately that’s not the case. But, that doesn’t mean it can’t still help your dog in a few ways. We’ll talk about them here.

And, a little disclaimer here, if your dog has cancer make sure you discuss this option with your veterinarian before implementing this into your dog’s routine. If your family veterinarian is unsure about alternative treatments, you can request a visit with a veterinarian who specializes in alternative medicine.

What Exactly is… The “C” word?

The basic definition of cancer is abnormal growth of cells in the body. The abnormal cells in the body grow uncontrollably (we’ll talk more about this in a few moments) and begin destroying the body’s ability to function properly.

Cancer is extremely common in dogs, approximately one of two dogs will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The types of cancer dogs are diagnosed with includes:

  • Skin Cancer: Skin cancer is common in dogs, but it is usually benign.
  • Mammary Cancer: Female dogs are prone to breast cancer. Breeds most susceptible to mammary cancer include Poodles, Dachshunds, and Spaniels.
  • Head and Neck Cancers: Dogs are prone to developing mouth cancer. This type of cancer must be treated immediately and aggressively. Dog breeds most susceptible to developing this type of cancer include Golden Retrievers, Irish Setters, German Shepherds, and Scottish Terriers.
  • Lymphoma: Lymphoma is cancer of the lymph nodes. Dog owners usually catch this cancer once an enlarged lymph node is apparent. Lymphoma can be an aggressive cancer and should be treated immediately following diagnosis. Breeds prone to Lymphoma include Dachshund, Pomeranian, Chihuahua, and Brittany Spaniel.
  • Testicular Cancer: Testicular cancer is common in dogs, particularly dogs who have retained testicles.
  • Bone Cancer: Bone cancer is common in large-breed and senior dogs. The most common area bone cancer occurs is in the leg bones. You may notice unusual swelling, lameness, or pain in dogs who have bone cancer. Certain breeds are more susceptible to bone cancer than others (Great Dane, Saint Bernard, Golden Retriever, Doberman Pinscher, Irish Setter).
  • Brain Cancer: Brain tumors develop in the tissue of the brain. They’re generally slow-growing and not found until symptoms begin. Fortunately, this type of cancer is rare in dogs. There are certain breeds at an increased risk including Doberman Pincher, Scottish Terrier, Olde English Sheepdog, and Golden Retriever.

There are other cancers dogs may develop… and even if your dog doesn’t have cancer I can’t recommend Dr. Dressler & Dr. Ettinger’s book enough. You can find it here. I have multiple copies… hopefully I will never need them. But, with the rates of cancer being so high, i’d rather be prepared.

How Can CBD Oil Help?

CBD oil helps to manage inflammation, decrease pain, manage seizures, and stimulate the appetite. Each of these benefits may sound relatively small when it comes to the full picture. But, each of these can result in your dog feeling much better. The anti-inflammatory and anti-pain effects from the CBD oil may help your dog feel more comfortable. Maintaining a healthy appetite is critical to your dog’s strength.

CBD has also been shown to stop cancer cells from growing and increasing the death rate of tumor cells. CBD kills cells by helping the immune system and blocks their ability to produce energy.

Cancer cells are different than your dog’s normal body cells because they don’t die on their own. Normal cells that are old or damaged have a “control system” that causes their death. This process of cell suicide is known as apoptosis. Cancer cells do not have the ability to induce apoptosis. The damaged/mutated cells just continue to grow and grow… which forms tumors. CBD has been shown to ‘turn on’ apoptosis and stop the growth of tumors.

CBD oil can also help increase the efficacy of conventional cancer treatments (chemotherapy, radiation). Researchers have found combining chemotherapy with cannabinoids had better results than using chemo alone. Researchers believe combining chemo and CBD can also reduce those terrible side effects, like nausea, from the chemotherapy treatments.

Testimonials Mean the World

Testimonials mean the world to us as dog lovers. We want to check out what others are saying about the product, right? Of course. That’s why we have compiled a few of CannaCanine’s CBD oil testimonials below:

“I have been using your CBD oil with Judah, my 13 year old Springer Spaniel, as a part of his natural treatment program for a skin cancer on his ear. This treatment includes prayer, faith, CBD oil, a healthy raw diet, and a couple other essential oils and cream. Since hearing of CBD oil, we have tried a couple different brands and have found yours to be of great quality. I have found that CBD oil applied topically has greatly helped with minimizing and controlling the affected area, while giving him a dropper by mouth each day has helped him to be at ease. Some of his lumps have even shrunk drastically! Thank the Lord!! Judah is such a good boy and deserves the best treatment. This is why I use CannaCanine! And it is awesome to hear that it is affective for anxiety too because I can recommend it to my training clients as another way in helping their dogs relax.” -Judah, Skin Cancer

“Rudy has bone cancer which puts a lot of strain on his system. It is painful and very exhausting as it drains his energy. However CBD oil has helped him increase his energy level and take away the inflammation in his leg. It also helps to relieve the pain caused by the cancer. CBD has made a huge improvement in the quality of his life! Rudy can now enjoy his days better in peace and comfort through CBD.” -Rudy, Bone Cancer

The Bottom Line on CBD and Cancer

There’s some promising research regarding CBD and cancer in dogs and humans. Researchers are continuing to study the benefits of CBD oil, and more research is expected to be released in the future. In the meantime, there are benefits researchers have found to help your dog already (reduced inflammation, etc.).

Don’t forget to talk to your veterinarian prior to implementing CBD into your dog’s routine. Once your veterinarian gives you the ‘go-ahead,’ visit CannaCanine’s store here and use code ‘YEAR’ for 30% off!

 

beef-stew-for-dogs

Say Goodbye to Kibble with These Home Recipes

Through my previous articles, you have learned about the damage our commercial dog food can do to our dog’s body. But, a home-based diet (homemade dog food) requires adding many ingredients to your dog’s routine. Clearly, it’s easier to buy dog food in a bag from the store, but I have compiled a few simple recipes for you to replace that old, smelly commercial diet. To ensure your dog is receiving all of the necessary nutrients, a multivitamin like EverPup can help.

How Can a Homemade Diet Help my Dog?

Homemade dog food can help your furry best friend significantly — especially a dog who suffers from allergies, gastrointestinal issues and/ or skin problems.

In addition to reducing health problems, you can feel at ease knowing you have complete control over what your dog is eating. You know what ingredients are in there. When you buy food in a bag, you really don’t know what’s in that bag. You just hope the manufacturer is making the right decisions. But, as you can see, the recall list continues to skyrocket.

If you cook food in large quantities, you can also save money by feeding homemade dog food. Most people are ‘turned off’ to the idea of making their dog’s diet themselves because they’re afraid of how much it will cost. They aren’t worried about the time- they just aren’t sure if they can afford it. But, the good part is, most of the ingredients you would cook for your dog you probably already have in your home. After all, they are omnivorous (eat plants and animals) just like us.

But unlike when we cook for ourselves, we can’t add spices to our dog’s food… and there are some ingredients that can’t be added at all that we will talk about in a few minutes.

Be Sure to Consult with Your Vet

Before implementing a homemade diet, consult with your veterinarian or canine nutritionist to make sure you’re not barking up the wrong tree with your dog’s nutritional needs.

Each dog has their own requirements, but there are some general balance guidelines you can keep in mind. Serving sizes depend on your pup’s weight, size and activity level.

Essentially, their diet should consist of the following:

40% Protein – animal meat, seafood, eggs or dairy
10% Carbohydrates – grains and beans
50% Vegetables
Fat – from oil or meat
Calcium – crushed or powdered egg shells; a supplement
Fatty acids – cooked egg yolks, oatmeal, plant oils and other foods

Low Calorie Dog Food Recipes

Homemade dog food is generally better for dogs than their kibble or canned dog food from the store. Because there aren’t any preservatives or additives, homemade dog food is also lower in calories. As with everything though, food should be given in moderation (and never any more than 10% scraps/treats).

Our Favorite Homemade Dog Food Recipes

We’ve written up some of our favorite dog food recipes to share with you. We hope you like them! Here you go!

Doggie Beef Stew: The Alternative to Canned Dog Food

Beef stew is a great dinner to feed our dogs… why? Because it naturally contains both meat and veggies. And, our dogs will happily eat the veggies found in the stew.

Ingredients

1 pound of beef stew meat
1 small sweet potato
1/2 cup of carrots, diced
1/2 cup of green beans, diced
1/2 cup of flour
1/2 cup of water or organic vegetable oil, plus 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil for frying
Total: Makes approx 4 cups (or 32 fluid ounces)

Directions

Cook the sweet potato in a microwave for 5 to 8 minutes until firm but tender. Set aside.
Slice the stew pieces into smaller chunks, about the size of a nickel.
Cook the stew pieces in a tablespoon of vegetable oil over medium heat for 10-15 minutes or until well-done.
Remove the beef chunks from the pan, reserving the drippings.
Dice the sweet potato.
Heat the drippings over medium-low heat. Slowly add flour and water into the dripping while whisking to create a thick gravy.
Add the meat, sweet potato, carrots and green beans into the gravy and stir to coat.
Cook until the carrots are tender – about 10 minutes.
Serve cool.
Store remaining stew in the fridge for up to five days.

Easy Crockpot Beef & Rice Meal

This is a great recipe to cook if we don’t have a large amount of time during the day. If you’re thinking, ‘oh my goodness, I have such a long day,’ and are wondering when you’ll have time to cook food for your family and your furry family, this is a great recipe for the day.

Ingredients

2 ½ pounds ground beef
1 ½ cups uncooked brown rice
1 (15-ounce) can kidney beans, drained and rinsed
1 ½ cups chopped butternut squash
1 ½ cups chopped carrots
½ cup frozen peas
4 cups of water
Total: Makes approx 11 cups (or 88 fluid ounces)

Directions

Stir in all ingredients with 4 cups of water in a crockpot.
Cover and cook on low heat for 5 to 6 hours or high heat for 2 to 3 hours.
Stir as needed and cool to room temperature.

The Pumpkin Dough Treats: For When Your Dog Has an Upset Tummy

Pumpkin is extremely beneficial to our dog’s body… and can help keep her healthy!

Ingredients

1/3 cup extremely cold water
2/3 cup pumpkin puree (canned or home-made)
2 cups whole grain brown rice flour
1 large egg (you can omit this if your dog is allergic to eggs)
2 1/2 tablespoonful flax-seed oil or olive oil
Total: Makes approx 24 1 oz balls (or 24 fluid ounces)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 320 – 350 degrees.
Use two baking sheets and baking paper to avoid sticking.
Mix lightly beaten egg and pumpkin in a separate container until smooth. If you don’t want to use egg then just smooth the pumpkin puree separately and proceed to the next step.
In a larger bowl, combine flax-seed oil and brown rice flour.
With constant stirring, add the pumpkin mixture to the rice mixture and slowly add water. Be sure to leave some of the rice to be used as some sort of toppings for the cookies.
Hand mix the ingredients thoroughly.
Using two pieces of baking or waxed paper, roll dough out to desired thickness.
Remove the top baking paper.
Evenly pour rice flour onto the top of the dough and lightly press it to the waxed baking paper.
Remove the paper and cut to desired sizes.
Place in the oven for 35 to 40 minutes or until the top is completely dry.
Cool and store in a dry plastic or glass container until ready to be served.

Homemade Chicken Jerky Strips

You should never trust store-bought raw hides, many contain a ridiculous amount of additives and preservatives. Plus, we have a recipe that tastes even better-homemade chicken jerky strips are a perfect replacement for rawhide. And, they’re easy to make. Store them in an air-tight container in the fridge for up to two weeks (if they last that long!).

Ingredients

2 to 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
Total: Makes approx 10-20 strips

Directions

Preheat oven to 200 degrees
Trim all excess fat off the chicken breasts
Cut into 1/8 inch thick strips using a paring knife
Bake for 2 hours on a baking sheet until strips are dry and hard
Cool completely before presenting to your pooch.

Frozen Banana Treats

These treats are perfect for those hot days. You know, the days where your dog is reluctant to even go outside? Or, is excessively panting because they’re so hot. And, it’s oh so simple. All you need is yogurt, bananas, and peanut butter.

Ingredients

4 cups plain yogurt
2 tablespoons peanut butter
3 bananas, ripe, peeled & mashed
Total: Makes approx 8 1 oz treats

Directions

Blend all ingredients together into a puree.
Pour into 4-ounce plastic cups (ice trays or toddler popsicle trays work well).
Freeze until firm.
Can be kept in freezer for up to two weeks.

Tips on How to Make Dog Food

It’s important not to feed your dog the same dinner you’re eating. Dogs have different nutritional needs than we do. And, our food is considered “table scraps” when we’re discussing it from our dog’s standpoint. Your dog’s diet should never be over 10% table scraps or treats.

What Foods Should Your Dog Never Eat?

As a dog lover, you’ve probably seen these foods on the ‘no-no’ list before, but it’s always good to have a reminder when you’re cooking homemade dog food. The most toxic foods to our dogs are the following:

Chocolate
Onions and garlic
Avocados
Grapes and raisins
Macadamia nuts
Raw bread dough
Alcohol

To see what else they’re not allowed to eat, click here.

Learn About the Dangers of Commercial Dog Food

Click the video below to learn why dog food is so dangerous to our dog’s health. You’ll be shocked, I know I was.

Get to Cookin’

Now that you have some recipes on hand, it’s time to get to cookin’. Have fun, and keep a watch on the Dog Behavior Blog for more recipes!